On November 8, 2017, the European Commission (EC) published its regulatory proposal for post-2020 carbon dioxide targets for new passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans). The proposed regulation would be the third set of mandatory vehicle CO2 performance standards in the European Union (EU).

At the North American Leaders Summit (NALS) in June 2016, the heads of the governments of Canada, Mexico, and the United States agreed to “commit to reduce air pollutant emissions by aligning air pollutant emission standards for light- and heavy-duty vehicles and corresponding ultralow-sulfur fuel standards by 2018.” To support regulatory effort

Crop residues, including wheat straw and corn stover, are a feedstock for the production of cellulosic biofuel that could contribute to meeting advanced biofuel targets and decarbonization goals for the transport sector. However, there are concerns about potential negative environmental impacts of crop residue harvest for biofuel production.

Ships are an efficient way to move cargo, transporting approximately 80% of the world’s goods by volume, but ships also threaten human health, ecosystems, and the climate. This report focuses on the air and climate pollutant black carbon (BC).

In August 2017 the government of India published final fuel-efficiency standards for commercial heavy-duty vehicles. The standards are the government’s response to India’s rapidly growing commercial vehicle sector.

In September 2017, China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection issued the first national standard for portable emission measurement system (PEMS) testing of heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs).

As vehicle pollution and fuel efficiency regulations have become more stringent, the technologies required to mitigate emissions and reduce fuel consumption become increasingly complex.

This briefing provides an update on the global electric vehicle capitals—that is, the cities leading the transition to electric drive with greater sales and sales shares than other markets.

New passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans) in the European Union are subject to mandatory carbon dioxide standards until 2020–2021. The European Commission, European Parliament, and EU member states are preparing to extend the light-duty vehicles’ CO2 regulation out to 2025–2030.

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is the key to avoiding the most catastrophic impacts of climate change. Despite international shipping being excluded from the Paris Agreement, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is developing its own strategy to reduce GHGs from ships.

Pages