The Asia-Pacific is the most vulnerable to climate-related shocks. This Seasonal Monitor provides a critical climate overview for WFP’s country offices in this region, with the aim of strengthening understanding, preparedness, and responses to these shocks.

In this brief, the World Food Programme (WFP) is introducing its flagship integrated climate-risk management approach, the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative (R4), to address both the climatic and non-climatic drivers of vulnerability in Haiti.

This report presents an overview on the impact of the global food crisis on the Asia Pacific region, with a focus on the impact on food security, nutrition, and the capacity of key actors to respond.

In drought affected areas of Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia, 22 million people are acutely food insecure and 5.1 million children are acutely malnourished.

The Strategic Framework for Resilience and Climate for Latin America and the Caribbean took as its starting point an integrated vision of resilience, with an emphasis on reducing the impact of climate change and improving food security and nutrition.

WFP is sharing the lessons learned of its partnership with the government of Mozambique for the implementation of anticipatory actions. Anticipating Extreme Weather. Since 2019, WFP has been working with the Government of Mozambique to introduce anticipatory actions based on a forecast-based financing mechanism.

Throughout 2022 levels of food insecurity have continued to increase in Eastern Africa, with 82 million people who are suffering from hunger. In South Sudan, approximately 6.6 million people – or over half of South Sudan’s population – are projected to experience high levels of acute food insecurity between October and November 2022.

As the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events rise, more needs to be done to anticipate, mitigate and prevent their impact on the food security of the world’s most vulnerable people.

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is supporting the Government of Zimbabwe to deliver climate information to the local population through Anticipatory Action (AA). To strengthen the AA programme in Zimbabwe, it was found necessary to consider the integration of Indigenous Knowledge Systems in the AA decision-making processes.

This report presents data from the Rwanda impact evaluation baseline survey. It describes the pre-programme baseline situation, looking at primary outcomes as well as other variables of interest. The report begins by reviewing the methodology of the evaluation, its design and randomization strategy.

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