The report presents the first global and regional estimates of the burden of foodborne diseases. The large disease burden from food highlights the importance of food safety, particularly in Africa, South-East Asia and other regions.

A growing body of evidence indicates that access to safe drinking-water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services has an important positive impact on nutrition. Achieving the six Global Nutrition Targets 2025, as well as global goals for WASH and health, will require greater investments in nutrition and WASH.

The Climate and Health Country Profiles provide relevant and reliable country-specific information about the current and future impacts of climate change on human health, the opportunities for health co-benefits from climate mitigation actions, and current policy responses at country level.

Antibiotic resistance is occurring everywhere in the world, compromising the treatment of infectious diseases and undermining many other advances in health and medicine. Antibiotic resistance occurs naturally, but misuse of antibiotics in humans and animals is accelerating the process. Tackling antibiotic resistance is a high priority for WHO.

This is the twentieth global report on tuberculosis (TB) published by WHO in a series that started in 1997.

A new WHO report highlights the urgent need to reduce emissions of black carbon, ozone and methane - as well as carbon dioxide – which all contribute to climate change.

The Global status report on road safety 2015, reflecting information from 180 countries, indicates that worldwide the total number of road traffic deaths has plateaued at 1.25 million per year, with the highest road traffic fatality rates in low-income countries.

By 2050, the number of people over the age of 60 is set to double. The "World report on ageing and health" highlights the need for major societal change, to ensure that people are not just living longer, but also healthier, lives.

The World Health Organization’s new Noncommunicable Disease Progress Monitor tracks the extent to which 194 countries are implementing their commitments to develop national responses to the global burden of NCDs.

Malaria death rates have plunged by 60% since 2000, translating into 6.2 million lives saved, the vast majority of them children, according to a joint WHO-UNICEF report released today.

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