Forestry is the second largest land-use in India after agriculture, and an estimated 275 million people in rural areas depend on forests for at least part of their livelihoods.

Forestry is the second largest land-use in India after agriculture, and an estimated 275 million people in rural areas depend on forests for at least part of their livelihoods. This study focusing mainly on community-based forestry outside protected areas, indicates that forests offer vast potential for poverty reduction and rural economic growth in India while also supporting critical national conservation goals. It debates the continued evolution of joint forest management in India by presenting research conducted within India and relevant examples from other regions.

Forestry is the second largest land-use in India after agriculture, and an estimated 275 million people in rural areas depend on forests for at least part of their livelihoods. This study focusing mainly on community-based forestry outside protected areas, indicates that forests offer vast potential for poverty reduction and rural economic growth in India while also supporting critical national conservation goals. It debates the continued evolution of joint forest management in India by presenting research conducted within India and relevant examples from other regions.

This paper looks at two interfacing trends shaping devolution of forest management in India: appropriation of space for forest management by diverse self-initiated community formations at the grass roots level despite state seizure of forests; and state-driven devolution where government policies define the scope of local authority in forest management.

In India, majority of the tribals live in the predominantly forest areas. Incidence of poverty is also quite high there. The tribals, as well as other people living inside or around the forests are dependent on the forests for their livelihood to a great extent. On the other hand, appropriate management of the forests for sustainable development is the need of the hour.

This book outlines the first alternative management plan proposed for the protecte areas of India. It provides both a general mode of community forest management in protected areas, and specific proposals for implementation in the proposed Rajaji national park.

This report by National Committee on Forest Rights Act (FRA) submitted by N C Saxena to Shri Kantilal Bhuria, Union Minister of tribal affairs says that with notable exceptions, the implementation of FRA has been poor & includes recommendations for implementing it effectively.

• Moratorium on entry of international financial institutions into forestry

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