Sudanese and Ethiopian leaders have confirmed their commitment to resolving the disputes with Egypt over the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) peacefully.

CHUKA, Kenya, May 2 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Phyllis Mugeni was watering her greens when she spotted a dozen armed men advancing from the lowlands to attack farmers working on the banks of th

The role of water crises in conflicts in places like Syria, Nigeria and Iran often feature in media and policy outlets. Many believe that climate change could spark future conflicts.

Violent attacks on and interferences with hospitals, ambulances, health workers, and patients during conflict destroy vital health services during a time when they are most needed and undermine the long-term capacity of the health system. In Syria, such attacks have been frequent and intense and represent grave violations of the Geneva Conventions, but the number reported has varied considerably.

Egypt's foreign minister has delivered a warning to Ethiopia over a dam it is building on a Nile River tributary.

The concept of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is built around low socioeconomic status (SES) and poverty as the most important social determinants [1]. Poor health is not confined to poor people, but the burden of poor health is disproportionately greater within poor communities. A combination of insufficient social programs, unfair economic arrangements, and corrupt politics creates conditions that allow poverty to obstruct health [2]. Within this paradigm is the impact of violent conflict.

Governor Ndiritu Muriithi has announced that the county will spend Sh15 billion on water projects in the next five years.

The 2018 Global Report on Food Crises provides the latest estimates of severe hunger in the world. An estimated 124 million people in 51 countries are currently facing Crisis food insecurity or worse (the equivalent of IPC/CH Phase 3 or above).

As the semi-nomadic Maasai of Kenya's Great Rift Valley prepare to lose more land to a geothermal plant, they hope to win a better deal this time, after meeting the Maori in New Zealand.

It isn’t climate change that will increase the frequency of civil war in Africa as a result of food scarcity, according to a study recently published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economi

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