The COVID‐19 outbreak has placed many internal migrant workers in dire conditions, many losing their (mostly informal) jobs and unable to return home due to disruption to public transport services and movement restrictions.

April 22 is the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day, and the COVID-19 pandemic underscores how connected we are, in every corner of the world. COVID-19 is impacting everyone around the world and every aspect of our daily lives: our social interactions, our family life, our communities, and, of course, how we all work.

Compared to the previous five-year assessment period 2011–2015, the current five-year period 2015–2019 has seen a continued increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and an accelerated increase in the atmospheric concentration of major greenhouse gases (GHGs), with growth rates nearly 20% higher.

COVID-19 is a great cause of concern globally and requires immediate actions to prevent its spread within communities. As of now, it is evident that the transmission of the disease is through direct human-to-human proximity or indirectly through contaminated surfaces.

Climate change is affecting every aspect of life on the planet, putting the lives of the most vulnerable people under threat and multiplying risks they are already struggling with. The world urgently needs to make the shift to a low-carbon future to avoid irreversible damage to our planet.

As the world grapples with the Coronavirus crisis, urgent action is required from all parts of the financial system, not just in the immediate health and economic emergency, but in the recovery that follows.

Fast forward to 2020 and the malaria landscape has changed considerably. On a global scale, progress has levelled off; according to our latest World malaria report, no gains were achieved in reducing malaria case incidence over the last five years. Worryingly, malaria is on the rise in many countries with a high burden of the disease.

For three decades, advocates for climate change policy have simultaneously emphasized the urgency of taking ambitious actions to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and provided false reassurances of the feasibility of doing so.

The 2020 edition of The Global Report on Food Crises describes the scale of acute hunger in the world. It provides an analysis of the drivers that are contributing to food crises across the globe, and examines how the COVID-19 pandemic might contribute to their perpetuation or deterioration.

This new report by IRENA shows the path to create a sustainable future energy system. It highlights climate-safe investment options until 2050, the policy framework needed for the transition and the challenges faced by different regions.

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