The world is now in the early stages of an energy revolution that over the next few decades could be as momentous as the emergence of oil-and electricity-based economies a century ago. Double-digit market growth, annual capital flows of more than $100 billion, sharp declines in technology costs, and rapid progress in government policies all herald a promising new energy era.

The IEA projects global primary energy demand could grow by 55% from 2005 to 2030, raising serious energy security and environmental sustainability concerns. How will we meet energy demand? How will we mitigate the resulting 57% increase in carbon dioxide emissions?

The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries is a dominant cartel consisting of producers with large reserves and it has always exercised its price-making power in the crude oil market. However, in the past few years, OPEC has been claiming that it has lost its power to alter crude oil prices. The article explores whether OPEC

Biofuels are being touted as a solution to rising fuel prices, growing energy demands, and the need to curb emissions of greenhouse gases. Governments have good reasons for promoting biofuels. Yet, a headlong rush into growing biofuel crops will bring its own problems.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) is developing in-depth indicators of energy use, efficiency trends and CO2 emissions. This latest publication provides a summary of the key results of the indicators work so far and shows how this can be used to identify the factors driving and restraining the demand for energy. Also explains why there are differences in energy intensities amongst countries.

Renewable energy offers the planet a chance to reduce carbon emissions, clean the air, and put the civilization on a more sustainable footing. It also offers countries around the world the chance to improve their energy security and spur economic development.

This report is part of the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP)

In 1997 the IEA produced a handy, pocket-sized summary of key energy data. This new edition responds to the enormously positive reaction to the books since then. Key World Energy Statistics from the IEA contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation and consumption of all major energy sources.

This paper proposes to test the global hybrid computable general equilibrium model IMACLIM-R against macroeconomic data. To do so, it compares the modeled and observed responses of the Indian economy to the rise of oil price during the 2003-2006 period.

World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 85 percent, compared with an increase of 19 percent in the OECD countries.

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