Renewable energy offers the planet a chance to reduce carbon emissions, clean the air, and put the civilization on a more sustainable footing. It also offers countries around the world the chance to improve their energy security and spur economic development.

This report is part of the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP)

In 1997 the IEA produced a handy, pocket-sized summary of key energy data. This new edition responds to the enormously positive reaction to the books since then. Key World Energy Statistics from the IEA contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation and consumption of all major energy sources.

This paper proposes to test the global hybrid computable general equilibrium model IMACLIM-R against macroeconomic data. To do so, it compares the modeled and observed responses of the Indian economy to the rise of oil price during the 2003-2006 period.

World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 85 percent, compared with an increase of 19 percent in the OECD countries.

VIEW FINDER A PASTIME TO TAP POWER This giant kite can generate 100 mw of energy, sufficient to light 10,000 homes. Scientists from Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands, designed this 1,000-ha multiple kites, called Laddermill. It taps the high-altitude wind, where winds carry a hundred times more energy than on the ground, and

Orlando Wagner and Jochen Hauff compare the booming renewables market with other sectors where a boom has been followed by a bust, on the lookout for danger signals. They conclude that the renewable energy sector has strong foundations - but does have some areas of vulnerability, which they examine in detail.

This paper focuses specifically on measures to increase the flexibility of power systems

This paper presents a set of indicators that are used to analyse the energy efficiency of electricity production from fossil fuels on a global level and for a number of key countries and regions. The analysis is based on IEA statistics and includes public electricity plants and public CHP plants.

Price is just the start of it. We need to kick the petroleum habit or we'll soon be in real trouble, says Ian Sample.

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