A new study by the Energy Watch Group has predicted complete phasing out of conventional power within the first half of the 21st century. Titled, 'Wind Power in Context: A Clean Revolution in the Energy Sector', the report predicts that global non-renewable power generation would 'peak' in 2018 and could be phased out completely by 2037!

This briefing paper synthesises recent debates, focusing on socio-economic factors. To what extent were biofuels to blame for the food price spike? What opportunities do biofuels offer for the poorest farmers in the developing world? What are their socio-environmental risks? The paper concludes with policy recommendations to reduce the risk and maximise the opportunities

Farmers are not alone in keeping a close eye on the weather-in the control centres of the energy sector and on the trading floor of the electricity exchange, too, it is always good to know exactly when the wind will be blowing or the sun shining. The special services offered by meteorologists are here invaluable aids to decision-making.

The purpose of this document is to identify and examine global policies, measures, and incentives that appear to be stimulating landfill gas (LFG) use.

www.wolfatthedoor.org.uk How much oil are we left with? Do soaring oil prices indicate that we have crossed the peak and that the present stock can sustain us only for another couple of decades? How much oil is undiscovered yet? Ask experts in the oil business, and they will explain in terms of reserve-production ratio or the Hubbert curve. Does this sound like Greek or Latin? Log on

The IFQC has ranked the top 100 countries based on benzene limits in gasoline.

Extensive analysis has been done in recent years on the technological, environmental and social aspects of biofuel production and trade. This paper aims to provide a succinct

The writer offers an insight into wind power technology in India - the current trends, progress, challenges and new innovations.

The world is now in the early stages of an energy revolution that over the next few decades could be as momentous as the emergence of oil-and electricity-based economies a century ago. Double-digit market growth, annual capital flows of more than $100 billion, sharp declines in technology costs, and rapid progress in government policies all herald a promising new energy era.

The IEA projects global primary energy demand could grow by 55% from 2005 to 2030, raising serious energy security and environmental sustainability concerns. How will we meet energy demand? How will we mitigate the resulting 57% increase in carbon dioxide emissions?

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