Two of every three families in villages used firewood for cooking during July, 2011 to June, 2012 period whereas in cities, only 14 per cent families were dependent on it, says a government report.

This report compares the approach to cookstoves of SNV, the Netherlands Development Organisation, with evidence from the sector about how interventions can lead to market transformation.

UNICEF has launched a new report highlighting the many ways in which sustainable energy is vital for children, providing major opportunities to improve their health, education, well-being and development. Energy is needed to deliver babies safely, keep vaccines cool, sterilise medical equipment and guarantee food and water quality.

Asian countries are making a vital contribution to achieving global sustainable energy goals, a new World Bank report finds. But while the region performs strongly on ensuring electricity access for people and using more modern renewable energy, there is room for further improvement on energy efficiency and access to clean, smoke-free cooking.

Sustainable energy access planning is aimed at developing a socially inclusive energy supply system that gives both the poor and the nonpoor sustainable access to at least the minimum amount of energy for their basic needs.

In order to support as critical input to air quality forecasting task during Commonwealth Games (CWG) – 2010 in mega city Delhi, we have developed a high resolution emission inventory of major atmospheric pollutants. For the same, inventories of ozone precursors like NOx and CO are developed over a domain of 70 km × 65 km with a grid of 1.67 km ×1.67 km resolution covering Delhi and surrounding region using Geographical Information System (GIS) technique for base year 2010.

This paper presents findings from the first phase of an ongoing case study to identify some key influences on behaviour related to energy use and the uptake of alternative clean cookstoves in households in Kibera, the largest informal settlement in Nairobi.

Energy is important to reduce poverty, but increasing electricity generation alone will not solve the problem.

Nearly 2.9 billion people still use polluting fuels like wood and coal to cook and heat their homes, at a huge cost to the society, in terms of health, environmental and economic costs, estimated at over US$123 billion every year according to this World Bank report. It provides a comprehensive picture of the current state of the global clean cooking sector and underlines urgent need to accelerate adoption of clean and efficient cooking solutions to reach sustainable energy goals by 2030.

1.1 billion people in the world still live without electricity and almost 3 billion still cook using polluting fuels like kerosene, wood, charcoal and dung says this new report that tracks progress of the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) initiative.

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