The coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease among Indians. Approximately 80 per cent of those who have heart problems suffer from this form of disease. "The reason of its prevalence is deposition of fats in arteries. A person should always maintain his or her health by taking proper diet, avoiding fats, regular exercise and de-stressing. A brisk walk of 45 minutes at least five days a week is really helpful in maintaining the health," said Dr Naresh Trehan, executive director and chief cardiac department, Apollo Hospital.

The World Health Organisation has designated Dr. Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre as its Collaborating Centre for Non Communicable Diseases Prevention and Control.

The Heart of Soweto Study aims to increase our understanding of the characteristics and burden imposed by heart disease in an urban African community in probable epidemiological transition. The authors aimed to investigate the clinical range of disorders related to cardiovascular disease in patients presenting for the first time to a tertiary-care centre.

the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare recently launched a national programme on prevention and control of non-communicable diseases

The authors assessed (i) the risk of cardiovascular disease in an industrial population in Chennai, southern India and (ii) whether the status of treatment and control of diabetes and hypertension would be different in an industrial population, which is provided free healthcare, compared with the general population of Chennai.

Childhood obesity has become a major societal concern. Rates of obesity among preschool and school-age children have more than doubled in the past three decades: 14% of 2- to 5-year-olds and 19% of 6- to 11-year olds are obese (Ogden et al. 2006; Ogden et al. 2002). The increased rates of obesity have become a public health concern because obesity is associated with chronic disease and adverse health outcomes (Institute of Medicine 2005).

India leads the world with largest number of diabetic subjects earning the dubious distinction of being termed the “diabetes capital of the world”. According to the Diabetes Atlas 2006 published by the International Diabetes Federation, the number of people with diabetes in India currently around 40.9 million is expected to rise to 69.9 million by 2025 unless urgent preventive steps are taken.

At the present stage of India's health transition, chronic diseases contribute to an estimated 53% of deaths and 44% of disability-adjusted life-years lost. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes are highly prevalent in urban areas. Tobacco-related cancers account for a large proportion of all cancers. Tobacco consumption, in diverse smoked and smokeless forms, is common, especially among the poor and rural population segments. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia, although common, are inadequately detected and treated.

At the present stage of India's health transition, chronic diseases contribute to an estimated 53% of deaths and 44% of disability-adjusted life-years lost. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes are highly prevalent in urban areas. Tobacco-related cancers account for a large proportion of all cancers. Tobacco consumption, in diverse smoked and smokeless forms, is common, especially among the poor and rural population segments. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia, although common, are inadequately detected and treated.

At the present stage of India's health transition, chronic diseases contribute to an estimated 53% of deaths and 44% of disability-adjusted life-years lost. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes are highly prevalent in urban areas. Tobacco-related cancers account for a large proportion of all cancers. Tobacco consumption, in diverse smoked and smokeless forms, is common, especially among the poor and rural population segments. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia, although common, are inadequately detected and treated.

Pages