Deadly ozone has raised its ugly head in Delhi and NCR and without a time bound implementation strategy and preventive action this can deepen into a serious public health crisis.

Already dealing with the high particulate matters in the air, the national capital this summer has witnessed an alarming build-up of ozone, a Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) study said on

Delhi has witnessed significant ozone build-up this summer, adding to the public health risk -- shows a latest analysis done by Centre for Science and Environment (CSE). Building up to the World Environment Day, CSE has analysed the real-time air quality data available from the key monitoring locations of Delhi Pollution Control Committee for the summer months of 2016 and 2017. This shows ozone pollution in the city is worsening progressively with the onset of summer.

Exposure to ambient air pollution increases morbidity and mortality, and is a leading contributor to global disease burden. We explored spatial and temporal trends in mortality and burden of disease attributable to ambient air pollution from 1990 to 2015 at global, regional, and country levels.

Air pollution has increased significantly in the last 25 years, and that’s having health consequences especially in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new Global Burden of Disease (GB

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Ozone Pollution, 14/03/2017. Government is aware of the news report regarding likely impact of ozone on human health. The data related to ozone, collected by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), for the year 2016 is annexed. The data collected shows that ozone levels have not exceeded the permissible level of 100 μg/m3 at any of the locations during the year 2016. Since the concentration of ozone is less than the permissible limits, the reports published need to be correlated with the data and scrutinized before arriving at any conclusion.

Residential combustion (RC) and electricity generating unit (EGU) emissions adversely impact air quality and human health by increasing ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3). Studies to date have not isolated contributing emissions by state of origin (source-state), which is necessary for policy makers to determine efficient strategies to decrease health impacts.

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Air pollution is the leading environmental cause of death worldwide according to the State of Global Air 2017, a new, first annual report and interactive website launched at www.stateofglobalair.org. The report also finds that 92% of the world’s population lives in areas with unhealthy air.

Air pollution travels over long distances and over national boundaries having a negative impact on human health.

Air pollutants, such as ozone, have adverse impacts on human health and cause, for example, respiratory and cardiovascular problems. In the United Kingdom (UK), peak surface ozone concentrations typically occur in the spring and summer and are controlled by emission of precursor gases, tropospheric chemistry and local meteorology which can be influenced by large-scale synoptic weather regimes.

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