Understanding farmers’ knowledge, atttitude and adaptation measures towards climate change in Anantapur District of A.P. - A presentation by Dr. K. Ravi Shankar at the 4th National Research Conference on Climate Change, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, October 26-27, 2013.

Sacred groves have survived very long without human interference, and thus are of anthropological, cultural, economic, and ecological significance. In India, these groves are concentrated in the North-East and along the Western Ghats, both globally recognised hotspots of biodiversity. Unfortunately, their size and number are now shrinking at an alarming rate, and it is high time a workable solution is found to sustain them.

Traditional knowledge is increasingly recognized as valuable for adaptation to climate change, bringing scientists and indigenous peoples together to collaborate and exchange knowledge. These partnerships can benefit both researchers and indigenous peoples through mutual learning and mutual knowledge generation. Despite these benefits, most descriptions focus on the social contexts of exchange. The implications of the multiple cultural, legal, risk-benefit and governance contexts of knowledge exchange have been less recognized.

They need less water, no fertilizer and hardly any care or attention.

A study published by the Centre for Development Studies (CDS) in 2004 had warned the government against the “destruction of traditional tribal agriculture that ensured food security to the tribespe

With an aim to identify and preserve the medicinal plants in the State, the Society for Promotion of Indigenous Knowledge and Practice (SPIKAP) is in the process of documentation and mapping of local health traditions in Meghalaya.

“The process also includes prioritisation, identification and mapping of medicinal plants used in the traditional medicine systems of the Khasi, Jaintia and Garo tribes of the State”, SPIKAP Chairman John F Kharshiing said on Thursday.

Solvent extracts of five Indian spices viz., Turmeric, Cinnamon, Cumin, Ginger and Garlic were examined for their antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity. The antioxidant capacity of the spice extracts were found in descending order: Cumin>Garlic>Cinnamon>Turmeric>Ginger by DPPH method, Garlic>Cumin>Turmeric>Ginger>Cinnamon by FRAP method and Turmeric>Cinnamon>Garlic>Cumin>Ginger by TPC method.

Farmers in Tamil Nadu are finding SRI method ideal for conserving traditional seeds of rice. Despite constraints, farmers are choosing SRI practices suitable for them and moving ahead. Support to overcome these constraints is necessary for large scale adoption.

The Tangkhul Nagas are intricately bound to nature in their social, cultural, economic, ethical and religious values. The dynamics of Tangkhul’s livelihood activities in many ways reflect the complexities of the human and nature relationship. Interactions between human and nature have undergone significant changes during the last century which leaves unwarranted impact on its natural environment. Today increasing scarcity of natural resources is serious in Tangkhul Naga society.

A number of forest communities have been living in forest fringe areas of the south-western part of the state of West Bengal, India for centuries. From this dry-deciduous Sal (Shorea robusta) forest area, forest villagers collect forest products for their daily household needs as well as they also sell a proportion of products at the local market. In socio-cultural life of these forest communities, the surrounding forest has a great impact. Minor forest products or non-timber forest products (NTFPs) are used for medicine, worship, decoration, jewellery, food, fodder, firewood etc.

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