This report has been prepared by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) as part of its knowledge support for the National Mission for Clean Ganga (NMCG) to develop water sensitive cities in the Ganga basin.

The theme for this third publication of the UNESCO i-WSSM Global Water Security Issues is the role of sound groundwater resources management and governance to achieve water security. As an underground resource, often called the invisible resource, groundwater is more difficult to quantify, assess and monitor than surface water resources.

The Karamoja subregion of Uganda is in a state of flux. Rapid change to the livelihoods and economic integration of people living in the region is accompanied by prevailing uncertainties over future climate impacts, with implications for the future management and availability of water and grazing resources.

Forests and trees play a vital role in meeting the world's increasing demand for water and need to be managed for water-related ecosystem services, according to a new guide co-published by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO), the Joint Research Centre of the European

Target 6.5 is: “By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate.” Indicator 6.5.1 tracks the degree of integrated water resources management (IWRM) implementation, by assessing the four key dimensions of IWRM: enabling environment, institutions and participation,

Target 6.5 is: “By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate.” Indicator 6.5.2 looks at the area of a country within transboundary basins and assesses the extent to which that area is covered by operational cooperation arrangements.

Target 6.4 is: “By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity.” Indicator 6.4.2 tracks how much freshwater is being withdrawn by all economic activities, compa

This report presents the global status on water-use efficiency and acceleration needs to achieve target 6.4 by 2030, based on the latest data on indicator 6.4.1. Water-use efficiency rose from 17.3 USD/m3 in 2015 to 18.9 USD/m3 in 2018 worldwide, representing a 9 percent efficiency increase.

Water challenges in the Middle East and North Africa existed for thousands of years. However, the scale and impact of the crisis today is unprecedented. UNICEF’s new report, Running Dry: Water scarcity and children in the Middle East and North Africa, highlights the scale and impact of the water crisis in this region today.

The 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has highlighted the importance of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in protecting human health.

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