Lifestyle diseases or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are responsible for more than 61 per cent of all deaths in India.

Whether it is heart diseases, respiratory illnesses, cancer, obesity or food allergies, emerging research reveals that the rise in their incidences is due to environmental factors—rapid urbanisation, air pollution and changes in diet—rather than your genes.

This volume emphasizes the need for fundamental reforms into the existing institutional structure of higher education and their governance so as to infuse much needed dynamism and renewed sense of purpose in the higher education sector in India. The contributors to the volume argue that universities ought to be dynamic institutions where new ideas are exchanged, mistakes made, and lessons learnt.

During 2014-2017 India was shaken by severe spells of drought that hit over 500 million people across geographical regions. Unlike in the past, these droughts did not spare the urban areas; metropolitan cities like Chennai, Hyderabad and Bengaluru declared water emergency and several towns resorted to water rationing. “Drought But Why?” examines how an occupational hazard has turned into a human-made disaster of unmanageable proportion since organised agriculture began some 10,000 years ago.

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