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The recent increase in nanoparticle (P25 TiO2 NPs) usage has led to concerns regarding their potential implications on environment and human health. The food chain is the central pathway for nanoparticle transfer from lower to high trophic level organisms. The current study relies on the investigation of toxicity and trophic transfer potential of TiO2 NPs from marine algae Dunaliella salina to marine crustacean Artemia salina.

Involvement of agrochemicals have been suggested in the development of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu). The association between CKDu and blood level of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in CKDu patients has been examined in the present study.

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The Lancet study concluded that pollution is now the largest environmental cause of disease and death in the world today — three times more those from HIV-AIDS, TB and malaria put together.

This report presents the UN-IGME's latest estimates, up to year end of 2015, of under-five, infant and neonatal mortality and assesses progress towards MDG 4 at the country, regional and global levels. Estimates to year end of 2016 will be published in September 2017.

This landmark study published in Lancer finds that toxic air, water, soils and workplaces kill at least 9 millon people and cost trillions of dollars every year. Pollution kills more people in India than anywhere else in the world revealed the study.

The 2017 volume of the Development Co-operation Report focuses on Data for Development. “Big Data” and “the Internet of Things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way that economies and societies are functioning across the planet.

Merely by conservation of nature, and reforestation, about 37 percent of global greenhouse gas emission could be reduced by 2030.

The Index of Economic Freedom provides compelling evidence of the wide-ranging tangible benefits of living in freer societies. The Index analyzes economic policy developments in 186 countries.

Heatwaves with large impacts have increased in the recent past and will continue to increase under future warming. However, the implication for population exposure to severe heatwaves remains unexplored. Here, we characterize maximum potential human exposure (without passive/active reduction measures) to severe heatwaves in India. We show that if the global mean temperature is limited to 2.0ºC above pre-industrial conditions, the frequency of severe heatwaves will rise by 30-times the current climate by the end -21st century.

India ranks the highest among the world's most disaster-prone countries for displacement of residents, with 23 lakh, on average, uprooted due to calamities such as floods, cyclones and earthquakes.

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