Accurate and up-to-date assessment of demographic metrics is crucial for understanding a wide range of social, economic, and public health issues that affect populations worldwide.

COVID-19-related health service disruptions could worsen the situation, potentially adding nearly 200,000 more stillbirths over a 12-month period warn the estimates released by UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank Group and the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

The point of the report is to track (and promote) progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals, and the big thing standing in the way of that progress right now is the pandemic. People living just above the extreme poverty line who have fallen below it because of COVID-19 were obviously vulnerable despite not being officially poor.

With the number of under-five deaths at an all-time recorded low of 5.2 million in 2019, disruptions in child and maternal health services due to the COVID-19 pandemic are putting millions of additional lives at stake.

Of all the regions of the world, Africa has the greatest number of least developed countries (LDCs). The Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011–2020 is therefore of considerable importance to the continent.

This report shows Canadian children are much less safe and healthy than before the pandemic began. In particular, it highlights the top 10 threats to children: unintentional injuries, poor mental health, child abuse, poverty, infant mortality, physical inactivity, food insecurity, racism, preventable illnesses and bullying.

While the COVID-19 pandemic will increase mortality due to the virus, it is also likely to increase mortality indirectly. This study estimates the additional maternal and under-5 child deaths resulting from the potential disruption of health systems and decreased access to food.

Question raised in Rajya Sabha on rise of infant mortality rate in India, 03/03/2020. As per Sample Registration System Report released in May, 2019, Infant Mortality Rate is 33 per 1,000 live births in 2017 in comparison to global average of 30 per 1,000 live births in 2017 as per UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation report.

In this paper, the impact of salinity on maternal and child health in Bangladesh is analyzed using data from the Bangladesh Demographic Health Surveys. A U-shaped association between drinking water salinity and infant and neonatal mortality is found, suggesting higher mortality when salinity is very low or high.

More women and children survive today than ever before. Despite strong progress, however, every 11 seconds, a pregnant woman or newborn dies somewhere in the world – deaths that can be prevented using skilled care before, during and after childbirth.

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