India, home to one-sixth of all humanity, holds the key to the success of the 2030 Agenda.

The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have even greater consequences than the last crisis. Economic activity has slowed down, and it remains uncertain when it will resume and what the long-term effects on trade and on other sectors will be. The education sector will face an uphill task.

More than 22,000 students, teachers, and academics were injured, killed, or harmed in attacks on education during armed conflict or insecurity over the past five years, according to Education under Attack 2020, a new 300-page report published today by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack (GCPEA).

Fewer than 10% of countries have laws that help ensure full inclusion in education, according to UNESCO’s 2020 Global Education Monitoring Report: Inclusion and education – All means all.

Globally, an estimated one out of two children aged 2–17 years old suffer some form of violence each year. Over their lifetime, children exposed to violence are at increased risk of mental and physical health problems, and negative educational outcomes. The economic costs of these consequences are enormous.

As nearly 1.2 billion schoolchildren remain affected by school closures and as they grapple with the realities of remote learning in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, UNICEF warns inherent inequalities in access to tools and technology threaten to deepen the global learning crisis.

Human well-being and capabilities are at the core of the transformations envisaged by the 2030 Agenda. This short policy brief reviews how investments in social protection, education and health care can help reduce poverty and inequality, boost well-being and enhance capabilities for all in Asia and the Pacific.

In recent years there has been an increasing drive for public financial management (PFM) to transcend its traditional role of financial control and function to a greater extent as an enabler of service delivery.

Directions issued In terms of Regulation 4(3) Of The Regulations made under the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (ACT NO.

Investing in human capital—the sum of a population’s health, skills, knowledge, and experience—can strengthen a country’s competitiveness in a rapidly changing world. Building human capital prepares work forces for the more highly skilled jobs of the future, which can drive more sustained growth and transform the trajectory of economies.

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