Achieving food security and improving nutrition are crucial to reach the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Estimates in 2020 showed that the number of hungry has been on the rise again, and is currently estimated at 690 million people.1 Obesity is also rising in all regions, reflecting a food system that produces unbalanced results.

A United Nations study indicates that hunger in the Arab region continues to rise, threatening the region's efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Zero Hunger goal.

Although severe hunger has not been a major issue in Europe and Central Asia in the past 20 years, the region is in part facing an increase of moderate food insecurity - understood as irregular access to nutritious and sufficient food -, while also dealing with the widespread rapid growth of obesity, challenging its ability to achieve food secur

More than one-third of the world population is overweight or suffering from hunger, proving that our current food system is inefficient and needs urgent transformations.

There was a modest decline in underweight prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa. Anaemia declined fastest among adult women and the richest pregnant women, although it affects all women with no marked disparities. Overweight is increasing rapidly among adult women and women with no education.

Following the release of the WFP COVID-19 Medium-term programme framework (MTPF), the Nutrition Division has developed a number of guidance tools and documents related to the MTPF pillars of work.

The global community has good cause to celebrate the progress achieved over the last quarter century in the name of girls’ rights. But we cannot lose sight of the challenges girls still face every day. Twenty-five years ago, the Beijing Platform for Action recognized that childhood is a separate space from adulthood.

This new report published in the journal “ Lancet” says that the future of children around the world including India, is being threatened by ecological degradation and climate change and exploitative marketing practices that push heavily processed fast food, sugary drinks, alcohol and tobacco at children.

This report lays out why overweight and obesity is a “ticking time bomb” with huge potential negative economic and health impacts, especially for the poor and people who live in low- or middle-income countries, dispel-ling the myth that it is a problem only in high-income countries and urban areas.

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