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This report looks at how debt and climate change are threatening the future of Small Island Developing States (SIDS), and suggests calls to action to help tackle these challenges. The oceans are scattered with small islands, dots on the world map that have too often been ignored. Yet they are home to sixty-five million people.

Developing countries — especially least developed countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) — face huge challenges in financing their current climate and nature needs.

Pathways to Adaptation and Resilience in the Pacific takes forward analysis of the Asia Pacific Disaster Report 2021 and showcases how the subregion is being affected by various risk parameters, and where new hotspots of exposure and vulnerability to climate-induced, cascading multi-hazard scenarios are being created.

This paper presents a detailed overview of the nature of loss and damage risks affecting low-income countries, marginalised groups and people living in poverty in the global South, and how they might be addressed.

Small island developing States (SIDS) are among the most water-scarce countries in the world, with seven in ten SIDS facing risks of water shortage, including nine in ten low-lying SIDS (UNESCO, UNEP, 2016).

This report examines the relationship between water governance and food insecurity in Small Island Developing States (SIDS). It starts by profiling the socio-economic and biophysical diversity in the SIDS, traces water flows on the islands in terms of volume and quality and identifies the factors that exert pressure on water resources.

Achieving food security and improving nutrition are crucial to reach the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

This sequel to the Groundswell report includes projections and analysis of internal climate migration for three new regions: East Asia and the Pacific, North Africa, and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Qualitative analyses of climate-related mobility in countries of the Mashreq and in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are also provided.

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have long pursued unconventional economic development strategies, often with great success. Equally, because of their susceptibility to exogenous shocks, which can be disproportionately more destructive than in larger states, their progress remains fragile and can be set back suddenly and dramatically.

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have long pursued unconventional economic development strategies, often with great success. Equally, because of their pronounced susceptibility to exogenous shocks, their progress remains fragile and can be set back suddenly and dramatically, as the Covid-19 crisis and secondary impacts have shown.

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