To date, governments have submitted inadequate and unambitious national climate targets that are not sufficient to meet the Paris Agreement long-term temperature goal according to the latest available science.

The picture on climate change is bleak. But 30 years of international climate cooperation have had a significant impact.

In this brief, explore the direct employment impacts of a coal-to-renewable transition in South Korea in line with a Paris compatible coal phase out before 2030. Compare this with the projected outcomes under current policies.

This weekend the members of the G7 will meet in the UK, in a year that marks an important deadline for countries to bring forward stronger climate targets. All of the G7 governments, covering roughly half of global GDP and over a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions, have enhanced their targets in the last year.

In this work present two unit-level decommissioning schedules that are aligned with a Paris Agreement compatible CO2 emission reduction pathway. Both of these schedules require 4.2 GW of coal capacity to be retired each year, and units currently under construction would only be able to operate for four years at the most.

This report presents domestic emissions pathways required to keep to the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit for five countries: Viet Nam, Philippines, India, Indonesia and Japan and assesses if current 2030 climate targets are in line with these pathways. Pathways are derived from the pathways assessed in the IPCC Special Report 1.5°C.

This briefing outlines why long-term strategies are a fundamental component of national climate policy architecture, and how SIDS can benefit from developing one, both directly in terms of prioritising efforts for achieving the Paris Agreement goals, and indirectly through synergies with other sustainable development and resilience goals.

Southeast Asia is one of the hotspots for global energy development. This report by Climate Analytics, supported by Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, looks into the need to stop the expansion of coal and phasing out coal for power generation to avoid the catastrophic climate change impacts that threaten the region.

Because of the international community’s delay in cutting carbon emissions, some degree of reliance on carbon dioxide removal (CDR) options is now inevitable to achieve the Paris Agreement’s long-term temperature goal. This report seeks to answer questions regarding implementation of CDR options at scale.

The European power sector is at the forefront of decarbonisation of the EU’s economy. Between 1990 and 2019 greenhouse gas emissions from the sector decreased by 44%, with a significant acceleration even before the COVID-19-induced economic crisis.

Pages