The entire shipping industry must invest urgently in sustainability if it is to withstand future shocks and help prevent another global cost-of-living crisis linked to supply chain disruption, UN trade and development experts UNCTAD said.

Accordingly, the draft Indian Ports Bill, 2022 (“IP Bill 2022”) has been prepared to consolidate and amend the laws relating to ports, for the prevention and containment of pollution at ports, to ensure compliance with the country’s obligation under the maritime treaties and international instruments to which India is a party; take measures for

This report takes a first look at China’s domestic coastal shipping sector and provides recommendations for actionable long-term decarbonization pathways designed to avoid exceeding its current share of transportation-sector CO2.

Order of the National Green Tribunal in the matter of Robert Drawin Vs State of Gujarat dated 24/01/2022.

Grievance in the application is regarding violation of environmental norms at Ghogha Sea Port, Bhavnagar, Gujarat relating to the beaching of a de-commissioned ship Dona Paula-II (IMO no. 8606446) in connivance with local authorities and Gujarat Pollution Control Board officials. The beaching of the ship is damaging the mangroves of that area and releasing harmful substances into the sea and thereby damaging the biodiversity and fisheries of that area.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on maritime trade volumes in 2020 was less severe than initially expected but its knock-on effects will be far-reaching and could transform maritime transport, according to UNCTAD’s Review of Maritime Transport 2021.

Urgent action is needed to accelerate the pace of the global energy transition and the decarbonisation of the global economy. International shipping is a key sector of the economy, as much as 90% of worldwide trade is transacted via ocean going vessels. The sector is also one of the most challenging to decarbonise.

This report provides a factual analysis of the environmental pressures exerted by the maritime transport sector, presents up-to-date information on the relevant EU and international environmental standards and describes current and future actions to reduce the sector's impact on our environment.

This briefing paper explains how policymakers can account for well-to-wake (WTW) carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions in strategies that aim to monitor or regulate climate-warming pollutants from ships. Well-to-wake emissions, or life-cycle emissions, are the sum of upstream (well-to-tank) and downstream (tank-to-wake) emissions.

Weaknesses and loopholes in maritime supply chains are often exploited by traffickers to smuggle illegal wildlife and timber products to feed growing demand, predominantly in Asian markets. Together, TRAFFIC and WWF are supporting the shipping sector to detect illegalities passing through global waters.

The Oeko Institute along with T&E has published a report on the integration of maritime transport in the EU emissions trading system (ETS).

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