Question raised in Lok Sabha on Carbon emission from aviation sector, 16/03/2017.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Carbon Footprint of Airlines, 14/03/2017. Emissions from international civil aviation are addressed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol.

Current air traffic routing is motivated by minimizing economic costs, such as fuel use. In addition to the climate impact of CO2 emissions from this fuel use, aviation contributes to climate change through non-CO2 impacts, such as changes in atmospheric ozone and methane concentrations and formation of contrail-cirrus. These non-CO2 impacts depend significantly on where and when the aviation emissions occur. The climate impact of aviation could be reduced if flights were routed to avoid regions where emissions have the largest impact.

The cabinet yesterday approved an aviation development plan proposed by the Transport Ministry in a bid to upgrade Thailand to a regional aviation hub in Southeast Asia.

Developing and promoting biofuels for aviation will be essential to reduce carbon emissions from commercial aviation. As a first step, some pioneering airports have already incorporated bio-jet fuel into their refuelling systems. Yet wider bio-jet adoption is constrained by high costs compared to fossil-based jet fuels.

The green panel also asked the ministry and the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) to develop green cover around the area and increase the height of the boundary wall of the airport to mi

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Carbon Emission from Aviation Sector, 15/12/2016. The carbon emission from Indian scheduled airline operators for the year 2015 is around 14.63 million tonnes.

The global market based mechanism are aimed at making essential contributions towards aviation sector's goal of carbon neutral growth from 2020 onward.

As a major global economic driving force, the transport sector –and in particular the automotive sector– has provided employment and shaped technological progress over the course of a century. This is true for Germany as much as it is for China. Daunting climate and environmental concerns have cast a large shadow on this development.

Airborne observations of greenhouse gases are a very useful reference for validation of satellite-based column-averaged dry air mole fraction data. However, since the aircraft data are available only up to about 9–13 km altitude, these profiles do not fully represent the depth of the atmosphere observed by satellites and therefore need to be extended synthetically into the stratosphere. In the near future, observations of CO2 and CH4 made from passenger aircraft are expected to be available through the In-Service Aircraft for a Global Observing System (IAGOS) project.

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