The 16th edition of the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report analyses the risks from societal fractures—manifested through persistent and emerging risks to human health, rising unemployment, widening digital divides, youth disillusionment, and geopolitical fragmentation.

As a second wave of COVID-19 causes further economic and social disruption, smart data-driven cities, powered by smart infrastructure and solutions, are using data analytics and predictive modelling to help shape their pandemic response to limit the loss of human life and minimize economic disruption.

The Global Competitiveness Report series has since its first edition aimed to prompt policy-makers beyond short term growth and to aim for long-run prosperity.

The World Economic Forum’s Clean Skies for Tomorrow coalition recognises that the most immediate action to achieve carbon-neutral flying is the investment in, and rapid scale-up, of sustainable aviation fuel production and use.

The Future of Jobs report maps the jobs and skills of the future, tracking the pace of change. It aims to shed light on the pandemic-related disruptions in 2020, contextualized within a longer history of economic cycles and the expected outlook for technology adoption, jobs and skills in the next five years.

This report seeks to advance the actionable understanding of an emerging set of approaches for data-driven food systems across stakeholders. It explores opportunities for data to enable better decision-making, advance business, product and partnership models, and empower stakeholders across the value chain.

Emerging technologies such as AI, 5G, DLT, and quantum are increasingly being used by financial services firms and are forming clusters that are driving innovation throughout the sector. These advances can offer new services and savings to both customers and financial institutions.

Smart home, a house equipped with internet-connected devices for controlling, automating and optimizing functions such as temperature, lighting, security or entertainment, either remotely or through a system within the house.

The COVID-19 pandemic is continuing to disrupt both manufacturing and global supply chains. Governments in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region have responded quickly by restricting the movement of people in order to contain the virus.

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated a shift to new ways of working, prompting companies to reimagine how, where and by whom work gets done. This shift was already under way with the technological changes of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

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