A circular carbon economy (CCE) model aims to manage the carbon in the system as opposed to solely working towards its elimination. This policy brief focuses on the carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) component of such a model in the context of India.

This study evaluates investments required to achieve India’s net-zero emissions target of 2070. Achieving net-zero involves technology pathways as well as financial flows. These finance flows, or investments, also known as total investment, are required to fund the construction of the associated physical infrastructure.

Most of the policy measures introduced in 2020 and 2021 as a response to the socioeconomic crises induced by the COVID-19 pandemic focused on addressing health concerns and a speedy economic recovery.

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to make significant progress around the world against a backdrop of greater climate action from countries and private companies. The Global Status of CCS 2021 demonstrates the critical role of CCS as nations and industry accelerate to net-zero.

Reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to net zero by 2050 is necessary to limit the long‐term increase in average global temperatures to 1.5 °C. Today, coal-fired power generation is the largest single source of CO2 emissions. Therefore, tackling emissions from this sector is critical to achieving our goal.

This study presents alternative peaking and net-zero scenarios for India and highlights its implications for transition in the energy-intensive sectors such as electricity, transport, building, and industry.

This study presents alternative peaking and net-zero scenarios for India and highlights its implications for transition in the energy-intensive sectors such as electricity, transport, building, and industry.

This issue brief highlights the escalating momentum of Carbon Capture, Utilisation, and Storage (CCUS) in India amidst a growing net-zero debate across the globe. CCUS has been a topic of discussion for more than two decades, but it has not gained any focus because of limited research, finance and policy support.

CCS is one of many climate mitigating technologies that is mature, commercially available, and absolutely necessary to achieve global net-zero ambitions and a stable climate. The total installed CCS capacity must increase 100-fold by 2050 to limit global warming to below 2° Celsius.

Carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) technologies are set to play an important role in supporting clean energy transitions in Southeast Asia. CCUS can address emissions from the region’s existing power and industrial assets while underpinning new economic opportunities associated with the production of low-carbon hydrogen and ammonia.

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