Companies from the world’s second-largest economy rank the lowest among Asia’s most developed economies on how they report their environmental impact, research by a United Kingdom-based financial markets data provider has revealed.

India, the US and China saw some of the biggest rises in greenhouse gas emissions last year due to booming energy consumption dominated by fossil fuels, putting global climate goals at risk, according to a new report.

This report provides preliminary (‘approximated’ or proxy) estimates of greenhouse (GHG) emissions for the year 2018 in the European Union (EU) and other member countries of the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report shows that in 2018, EU GHG emissions decreased in 2018, with the largest emission reduction observed since 2014.

The annual ‘Trends and projections’ report provides an assessment of the progress of the EU and European countries towards their climate mitigation and energy targets. It is based on national data for greenhouse gas emissions, renewable energy and energy consumption.

To mark ten years of the Emissions Gap Report, and inform the Climate Action Summit, UNEP released Lessons from a decade of emissions gap assessments. The report finds that the last ten years have, in some ways, been a lost decade of climate action. Greenhouse gas emissions have only grown, and faster and deeper cuts are now urgently needed.

This report is the second global analysis of local and regional government and corporate climate contributions, updating “Global Climate Action from Cities, Regions, and Companies” launched at the 2018 Global Climate Action Summit.

Argentina has shown many positive developments in the climate space since 2015, but Argentina’s climate commitment in 2030 is not consistent with holding warming below 2°C, let alone limiting it to 1.5°C as required to achieve the Paris Agreement.

To achieve the Paris Agreement goals and limit global temperature rise this century to 1.5°C, the global economy must be rapidly transformed. A carbon price is needed to incorporate climate change costs into economic decision-making to significantly reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, particularly in the electricity sector.

This study assesses the EU’s 2050 target, i.e. halving global emissions by 2050 to be in line with 2°C, in today’s setting to evaluate if the target, which was set ten years ago, is still appropriate and/or sufficient. It offers recommendations for the EU to aim for more ambitious targets.

This study assesses the EU’s 2050 target, i.e. halving global emissions by 2050 to be in line with 2°C, in today’s setting to evaluate if the target, which was set ten years ago, is still appropriate and/or sufficient. It offers recommendations for the EU to aim for more ambitious targets.

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