This briefing presents the results of a preliminary analysis into United States’ subnational and non-state action and its impact on national greenhouse gas emissions, if fully implemented. The analysis covers commitments from individual actors, which set quantitative mitigation targets and for which historical emissions data are available.

This briefing presents progress made by the EU and Member States in meeting their emission ceilings that are applicable since 2010 and which remain applicable until 2019 under the new National Emission Ceilings (NEC) Directive; (EU) ; EU, 2016).

G20 and Climate Change: Time to Lead for a Safer Future, by CARE International, outlines the current G20 climate change picture and provides recommendations on key steps and agreements G20 countries need to take in 2017 and at the upcoming leader’s summit (7/8 July in Hamburg, Germany).

The UN Paris Agreement puts in place a legally binding mechanism to increase mitigation action over time. Countries put forward pledges called nationally determined contributions (NDC) whose impact is assessed in global stocktaking exercises. Subsequently, actions can then be strengthened in light of the Paris climate objective: limiting global mean temperature increase to well below 2 °C and pursuing efforts to limit it further to 1.5 °C. However, pledged actions are currently described ambiguously and this complicates the global stocktaking exercise.'

The report is a one stop shop for learning about key developments and prospects of existing and emerging carbon initiatives. There is a continued momentum for carbon pricing. As of 2017, over 40 national and 25 subnational jurisdictions representing almost a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions are putting a price on carbon.

Nations around the world have adopted more than 1,200 laws to curb climate change, up from about 60 two decades ago, which is a sign of widening efforts to limit rising temperatures shows this study by the London School of Economics

Climate negotiation outcomes are difficult to evaluate objectively because there are no clear reference scenarios. Subjective assessments from those directly involved in the negotiations are particularly important, as this may influence strategy and future negotiation participation. Here we analyse the perceived success of the climate negotiations in a sample of 656 experts involved in international climate policy.

Order of the Supreme Court of India in the matter of M. C. Mehta Vs Union of India & Others dated 02/05/2017 regarding ban on sales and use of furnace oil and pet-coke in Delhi NCR.

EPCA report submitted before the Supreme Court states that the state governments of Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and Rajasthan have no objection if a ban is placed on the use of Furnace Oil and Pet Coke like in Delhi. It is also pointed out SO2, Nox and Sox standards have not been fixed for almost 35 industries.

The CDM has by now become an established mechanism for crediting climate friendly projects. Projects involving displacement or saving of grid electricity must calculate their emission reductions based on a grid emission factor which needs to be determined in accordance with the rules set by the CDM Executive Board.

This Climate Scorecard Report provides descriptions of climate change policies that have been put in place by the leading greenhouse gas emitting countries. These policies provide important insights on what each country is doing to reduce emissions and implement the Paris Agreement.

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