Ministers of Finance, Agriculture and Governors of Central Banks from African countries have called for further innovative financing mechanisms to deal with the impact of climate change, which has

A new WHO report shows that the world’s poorest countries can gain US$350 billion by 2030 by scaling up investments in preventing and treating chronic diseases, like heart disease and cancer, that cost an additional US$1.27 per person annually. Such actions would save more than 8 million lives over the same period.

The African Statistical Yearbook (ASYB) 2018 is the tenth edition jointly produced by the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Union Commission (AUC) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA). It is a result of the fruitful collaboration that exists among the three pan-African organizations within the field of statistics.

Economic growth performance in the Asia-Pacific region continues to improve on the back of firmer global demand and stable inflation. The tasks at hand are to ensure that such economic performance is sustained over time, that it benefits everyone and that any adverse environmental implications are minimal.

Economic growth performance in the Asia-Pacific region continues to improve on the back of firmer global demand and stable inflation. The tasks at hand are to ensure that such economic performance is sustained over time, that it benefits everyone and that any adverse environmental implications are minimal.

Finance for poor countries to help them reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and deal with climate change is lagging behind the promises of rich countries, an Oxfam report finds.

Banks are under pressure to disclose how their lending and investment activities affect global climate goals, but have struggled to choose the right metrics.

More and more non-energy companies are voluntarily – and actively – procuring or investing in self-generation of renewable energy. Driven by sharp cost reductions, combined with growing calls for sustainability among investors and consumers, renewables have become an attractive source of energy for corporate users around the world.

India’s economy is growing rapidly, and with it, so is energy demand. The IEA-IEO (2015) estimates that India’s aggregate energy consumption will more than double by 2040. The Government of India plans to install 175 GW of renewable energy projects by 2022 and 275 GW by 2027.

Every year natural and man-made catastrophes cause a distressing loss of lives and considerable economic costs around the world. Both industrialised and developing countries are affected, and surprisingly, both are also materially underinsured.

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