The mobility needs of people who walk and cycle – often the majority of citizens in a city – continue to be overlooked. Even though the benefits of investing in pedestrians and cyclists can save lives, help protect the environment and support poverty reduction.

Agriculture's vast potential to improve nutrition is just beginning to be tapped. New ideas, research, and initiatives developed over the past decade have created an opportunity for reimagining and redesigning agricultural and food systems for the benefit of nutrition.

Coastal communities in South and Southeast Asia are strongly tied to marine and coastal resources that are vital for their food security and livelihoods. Meanwhile, pervasive expansion of the global economy is leading to rapid changes in coastal and marine resources, specifically through overfishing and hasty coastal development.

Universal health, education and other public services reduce the gap between rich and poor, and between women and men. Fairer taxation of the wealthiest can help pay for them. Our economy is broken, with hundreds of millions of people living in extreme poverty while huge rewards go to those at the very top.

Today, more than 8.1 million Nepalis live in poverty. Women and girls are more likely to be poor, despite the significant contribution they make to the economy, especially through unpaid care and household work. More than one-third of Nepal’s children under 5 years are stunted, and 10% suffer wasting due to acute malnutrition.

Three Seychellois women have been recognized and awarded by CEO Global for the important role they have played in their particular field, pushing forward the development of society.

The Agriculture sector in Ethiopia is still practiced in a traditional way and has become incapable to provide food and nutrition security for the majority of the population. As a result, malnutrition has remained to be one of the leading health challenges in Ethiopia being responsible for 53% of infant and child deaths.

This study examines the drivers of tenure insecurity in Mozambique using data from the National Agricultural Survey (TIA) 2014 as well as a follow-up supplemental survey with detailed land tenure gender-disaggregated data from three groups: namely, principal male, principal female, and female spouses.

There is growing recognition of the importance of women’s empowerment in its own right and for a range of development outcomes, but less understanding of what empowerment means to rural women and men. The challenge of measuring empowerment, particularly across cultures and contexts, is also garnering attention.

Renewable Energy: A Gender Perspective provides new insights on women’s role in renewable energy employment and decision-making globally. This key report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) aims to help fill the knowledge gap in this field.

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