The purpose of this study was to undertake an empirical investigation of adaptation “good practices” and define six categories of actions that can be practically considered by governments for scaling-up in order to reduce the risks of climate change.

The new publication is a guide for policy-makers, administrations and interested citizens and serves as framework document for sustainable transport policy. Transport is often seen as gender neutral – a road or bus system will benefit all equally. In fact, it´s not!

Transit alliances are a solution to make public mobility attractive for all - by incorporating multiple operators into one system! In many cities, both quantity and quality of public transport services are not keeping pace with population growth and social expectations.

This publication is a major update of the “Training document on public awareness and behaviour change in sustainable transport” published in 2006 by GIZ.

The Report Transport in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) that was published ahead of the 23rd Conference of the Parties (COP23) in Bonn, Germany summarises case study findings from rapidly-motorising countries, including Bangladesh, Colombia, Georgia, Kenya, Nigeria, Peru and Viet Nam.

This report presents the methodology and results of a study assessing increased lexibility requirements to the South African power system resulting from increased levels of renewable generation in the time frame until 2030. The study further analyses whether the existing and planned power plants will be able to cope with these requirements.

Fuel prices, especially the prices of gasoline and diesel, shape our mobility patterns. Low fuel prices benefit motorized transport and encourage low energy efficiency technologies and wasteful behaviour.

The development of electric vehicles (EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs)) could enhance fuel diversity and utilise renewable energy, which is considered a promising, long-term solution to reduce high dependence on fossil fuels and alleviate climate change impacts from a global perspective.

With over 1.24 million deaths and up to 50 million injuries every year on roads – over 90% of which happen in low and middle income countries (LMICs), road safety is now recognized as an urgent global problem often costing such countries between 3-5 % of their annual GDP and impeding their economic and social development.

As a major global economic driving force, the transport sector –and in particular the automotive sector– has provided employment and shaped technological progress over the course of a century. This is true for Germany as much as it is for China. Daunting climate and environmental concerns have cast a large shadow on this development.

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