This publication explores the potential of the Meghna River as an alternative water source for Dhaka. It also describes the fragile state of the city’s current drinking water supply due to increasing demand and surface contamination.

Water quantity—too much in the case of floods, or too little in the case of droughts—grabs public attention and the media spotlight. Water quality—being predominantly invisible and hard to detect—goes largely unnoticed.

This technical note serves as the main reference for the updated Aqueduct™ water risk framework, in which combine 13 water risk indicators—including quantity, quality, and reputational risks—into a composite overall water risk score.

Asia and the Pacific’s unrelenting industrial development has been a driving force in the economic growth of scores of countries in the region and beyond. This shift has led to greater prosperity, increased urbanization and sustained population growth.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Pollution in Rivers, 21/06/2019. The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) in association with State Pollution Control Boards (SPCBs)/ Pollution Control Committees (PCCs) monitors the water quality of rivers across the country through a network of monitoring stations under the National Water Quality Monitoring Programme. The criteria/norms of standard level water pollution for major rivers are generally based on Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD)levels, a key indicator of organic pollution.

The report assesses bathing water quality in 2018, indicating where the quality of bathing water is expected to be good in 2019. The report was compiled using information from more than 21 000 bathing waters in the 28 EU Member States. It also covers bathing waters in Albania and Switzerland.

Prudent economic policies, combined with the enabling conditions created by a high endowment of water, have transformed Vietnam from a low-income to a middle-income country within two decades. Though growth has produced vast benefits, it has also placed unrelenting pressures on water resources, which in turn lead to economic stresses.

Infrastructure development and other human-made changes are the leading contributors to connectivity loss in global rivers, resulting in disrupted ecosystem services, claimed researchers.

The Environmental Management Agency (EMA) yesterday accused City of Harare of not taking action over the pollution at Lake Chivero, the city's main water supply reservoir.

Shortage of clean water has been cited as the reason Nairobi, Narok, Kajiado, Garissa and Machakos counties have experienced cases of cholera.

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