Access to safe water and adequate sanitation is a basic human right. While progress has been made towards the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goal on water and sanitation (SDG 6), the trends and current status of access to water and sanitation provide cause for concern.

In 2022, South Sudan was ranked as the world’s most vulnerable country to climate change and the one most lacking in coping capacity. South Sudan is also one of the world’s most politically fragile countries.

Findings from the World Health Organization and UN-Water’s Global Analysis and Assessment of Sanitation and Drinking-Water (GLAAS) report shows that acceleration is needed in many countries to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6 – water and sanitation for all by 2030.

This report, presents the data on the links between water, health and development and the status of drinking water, with actionable recommendations to accelerate access to safe drinking water.

This study analyses the extent to which data and information on safely managed drinking water services are reported in India. Such data is characterised by access to the improved source of drinking water that is located on the premises, available when needed, and free from faecal and priority chemical contamination.

As many as 41.5 crore people exited poverty in India during the 15-year period between 2005-06 and 2019-21, out of which two-thirds exited in the first 10 years, and one-third in the next five years, according to this global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI).

UNICEF has launched a new guide on financing water, sanitation and hygiene in a bid to expand critically needed services to millions worldwide.

This publication on Youth and Water Security in Africa, which comprises 25-refereed articles co-authored by youth including female scientists primarily from Africa, derives from collaboration among UNESCO, the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) and the International Science Council (ISC) Regional Office for Africa (ROA

Living customary water tenure is the most accepted socio-legal system among the large majority of rural people in sub-Saharan Africa.

This document is part of a series of guidebooks that address various aspects of monitoring and assessment of freshwater. It describes the main features of groundwater that govern its quantity, availability and chemical quality.

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