Target 6.4 is: “By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity.” Indicator 6.4.2 tracks how much freshwater is being withdrawn by all economic activities, compa

The 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has highlighted the importance of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in protecting human health.

Enhancing accountability has become an important objective of the governance reforms over the past two decades. This has resulted in the promotion of social accountability tools, which aim to enhance citizens’ voices, reduce corruption and improve service delivery in the development sector.

As part of a water and climate campaign, WaterAid West Africa has conducted two research studies on the impacts of climate change on water security in the region, focusing on Burkina Faso and Niger. West Africa, particularly the Sahel, is a climate change hotspot.

Billions of people around the world will be unable to access safely managed household drinking water, sanitation and hygiene services in 2030 unless the rate of progress quadruples, according to a new report from WHO and UNICEF.

At present a total of 1500 GWMWs are monitored representing almost all the blocks of twenty three districts of the states of West Bengal. Due to inaccessibility in Andaman group of Islands, initially the task was taken up with the help of a few GWMWs but gradually the number of stations have been increased to 113.

Access to sufficient and clean freshwater is essential for all life. Water is also essential for food system functioning: as a key input into food production, but also in processing and preparation, and as a food itself. Water scarcity and pollution are growing, affecting poorer populations, particularly food producers.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, an accelerating climate crisis and rising global poverty, a new report by End Water Poverty and WaterAid sets out the financial challenge of achieving water and sanitation for all by 2030.

Universal access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene, a human right enshrined in the 2030 Global Goals, will not be reached unless its affordability is addressed and monitored, according to a new report.

Groundwater on account of its universal availability, dependability and low capitalcost, is the major source of water to meet the requirement of various sector in India.

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