Deforestation rates are significantly lower in Indigenous and Tribal territories where governments have formally recognized collective land rights, according to a new report.

Rejoinder by the Joint Committee to the objections filed by the applicant on the report of the Joint Committee in Original Application 29/2020 (SZ) in the matter of Sajimon Salim Vs Union of India & Others dated 21/01/2021. The matter related to the allegation of illegal construction of a football ground in Periyar Tiger Reserve.

Tenurial rights are critical for the Indigenous and forest-dwelling communities, and especially tribal groups of India. The discourse around the ownership, governance and management of forests in India underwent a significant change with the enactment of the Forest Rights Act, 2006.

Indian laws – the Forest Conservation Act, 1980 along with the Forest Rights Act (FRA), 2006 and the Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act (LARR), 2013 – make it mandatory for government bodies and the promoters of projects to obtain the consent of Indigenous people and other communi

This report is informed by the imperative to prevent the collapse of biodiversity while respecting the tenure and human rights of Indigenous Peoples (IPs), local communities (LCs), and Afrodescendants (ADs).

This brief discusses legislative developments during COVID-19 in India, Indonesia, and the Philippines that undermine sustainable human-environment interactions and IPs’ and LCs’ broader enjoyment of their rights over their customary territories.

With at least 6 million cases, India is currently among the world’s top three countries affected by COVID-19. The country’s forest-dwelling and Adivasi communities – already vulnerable and marginalized – have also suffered the pandemic’s economic ravages, facing extensive food insecurity and loss of livelihoods.

Bamboo is one of the most important non-wood forest resources used extensively by tribals and rural poor in Tripura. While it plays an important role in the economy of the State and in subsistence activities, employment generation and household income, the economic potential is significantly greater.

This report examines the implementation of the Convention No. 169 and the current social and economic situation of indigenous people across the world.

A new report by Survival International has revealed that the mass eviction of tribal people in India whose lands are being turned into tiger reserves is illegal under both national and international law.

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