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The report examines the impacts of the crisis on global and regional trends in employment, unemployment and labour force participation, as well as on job quality, informal employment and working poverty. It also offers an extensive analysis of trends in temporary employment both before and during the COVID-19 crisis.

This paper examines the short-term implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for inequality in developing countries.

As the world enters the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the climate crisis remains the biggest long-term threat facing humanity, according to the 2022 Global Risks Report released by the World Economic Forum

The global recovery is set to decelerate amid diminished policy support, continued COVID-19 flare-ups, and lingering supply bottlenecks. In contrast to that in advanced economies, output in emerging market and developing economies will remain markedly below pre-pandemic trends over the forecast horizon.

Acute malnutrition in children under five remains a critical challenge, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Estimates indicate that up to 9.3 million more children will suffer from acute malnutrition by 2022.

Kenya's economic damage caused by COVID-19 will result in a downturn by 2023 that leaves the gross domestic product (GDP) to about 9 percent below the pre-crisis forecast, says a joint report released by economic think tanks.

This book aims to provide statistical perspectives in figures and tables of natural disaster data. Published annually by Asian Disaster Reduction Center (ADRC), the Natural Disasters Data Book obtains data from EM-DAT and analyses it to show the occurrence, death tolls, people affected, and economic impact of disasters.

This report presents the main economic impacts of the pandemic on macroeconomic and sectoral performance, as well as on the business base. The study also seeks to examine the effects of the pandemic on employment, consumption behaviour, institutional capacity, poverty and informal activities.

As of November 2021, less than 7% of the African continent has been vaccinated. This gap between acceptance and coverage demonstrates a substantial unmet need and underscores the importance of consistent and predictable vaccine supply as well as increased support for vaccination programs in Africa.

This report critically examines the nature of the distinction between traditional inter-state diplomacy and sustainable development diplomacy. It then sets out the institutional changes which are necessary for the achievement of sustainable development diplomacy.

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