To support data collection on malnutrition and food insecurity among PLHIV in Tunisia, WFP and the Tunisian government conducted a district-level assessment of food and nutrition security among PLHIV.

This report provides accountability for the 3 Global Health Sector Strategies (2016-2021) on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and the STIs. The report assesses the impact, progress and gaps, and identifies actions to improve impact.

Inequalities in addressing AIDS threaten global efforts to stamp out the disease as a public health threat by 2030, UN Secretary-General António Guterres warned in a report published, which provides 10 key recommendations to get the world back on track.

Accurate and up-to-date assessment of demographic metrics is crucial for understanding a wide range of social, economic, and public health issues that affect populations worldwide.

With 1.7 million new infections in 2019 and 38 million people living with HIV worldwide, we are living in a time of two parallel pandemics. The protection and promotion of human rights has been central to the approach and success of the HIV response.

UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic shows that 2020 targets will not be met because of deeply unequal success; COVID-19 risks blowing HIV progress way off course. Missed targets have resulted in 3.5 million more HIV infections and 820 000 more AIDS-related deaths since 2015 than if the world was on track to meet the 2020 targets.

A new report has shown that deaths from HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria could double if systems for health are overwhelmed, treatment and prevention programmes are disrupted and resources are diverted.

A modelling group convened by the World Health Organization and UNAIDS has estimated that if efforts are not made to mitigate and overcome interruptions in health services and supplies during the COVID-19 pandemic, a six-month disruption of antiretroviral therapy could lead to more than 500 000 extra deaths from AIDS-related illnesses, including

Between 1995 and 2018, the steepest decrease in new HIV infections among women occurred among adolescent girls and young women (aged 15 to 24 years)—a decline of 44% globally. Prevention programmes that focus on this age group are having an impact.

The Free to Shine campaign1 is an initiative of the African Union, the Organization of African First Ladies for Development (OAFLAD) and partners to address the growing complacency in the response to childhood HIV in Africa.

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