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This paper explores the relationship between antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and water pollution. It highlights how the amount of consumption and discharge of antimicrobial drugs into water bodies, in combination with the socio-economic vulnerability of a country determines the rate at which AMR spreads.

This report highlights gaps and possibilities in the guidance of the Tripartite organizations on antimicrobial use in food-producing animals. It presents current practices in India with regard to their use in multiple food-animal sectors and identifies gaps and possibilities in policies and guidelines.

The report presents key take-aways from the deliberations held at the Africa-Asia Virtual Workshop on Containing the Silent Pandemic, organized by the Centre for Science and Environment in March 2021.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) can be described as the quintessential One Health issue: it involves humans, animals and the environment. It is also a multisectoral food safety problem whose effects transcend borders.

Improvements in water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and wastewater management in all sectors are critical elements of preventing infections and reducing the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) as identified in the Global Action Plan to combat AMR.

Order of the National Green Tribunal in the matter of Mohammed Nayeem Pasha & Others Vs The State of Telangana & Others dated 06/12/2019 regarding remedial action against pollution of river Musi at Hyderabad, Telangana which is reported to be contaminated due to industrial and domestic sewage discharged into the river or into the drains connected thereto. The industries in the catchment areas are bulk drug and pharmaceutical units.

The key objective of this research was to generate new evidence on outpatient antibiotic prescription rate and patterns in the private sector in India. We used 12-month period (May 2013 to April 2014) medical audit dataset from IQVIA (formerly IMS Health).

Antimicrobials (AM) play a critical role in the treatment of human and animal (aquatic and terrestrial) diseases, which has led to their widespread application and use. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is the ability of microorganisms (e.g.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), Colistin is a “reserve” antibiotic, which means it is supposed to be considered a “last-resort” option in treatment and used only in the most sever

In light of established principles and strategies for appropriate use of antimicrobial medicines, this paper examines studies on antimicrobial use trends across several countries in the Asia and Pacific regions.

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