Animal health is important to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but greater investment is needed to evaluate the impact, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and partners said in this report.

Region-wise analyses highlight that the agricultural growth in the western, central and Bundelkhand regions significantly depend upon the basic infrastructure including adequate power to the agricultural sector, better road network, and irrigation development, though the variable power to agriculture was insignificant in Bundelkhand.

The Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land use (AFOLU) sector comprises of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture practices, livestock, and changes in forest and land use. GHG emissions from livestock sub-sector includes emissions due to enteric fermentation in herbivores and manure management practices.

National Statistical Office (NSO) in its 77th round of survey, conducted during the period 1st January 2019 to 31st December 2019, carried out a survey on “Land and Livestock Holdings of Households and Situation Assessment of Agricultural Households” in the rural areas of India with an integrated schedule of enquiry.

A recent report has revealed that around 20 dairy companies are responsible for more greenhouse emissions than Germany, Britain, or France. The livestock companies are earning billions of dollars in this operation.

African countries have diversified both their exports and trade partners over the last decade, African agricultural trade still suffers from structural problems as well as exogenous shocks.

The National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) has revealed five key setbacks that limit agriculture productivity in Tanzania. In a new report, the bureau named the issues being the limited access to extension services, slow implementation of irrigation systems, low use of fertilizers, improved seeds as well as underdeveloped mechanization.

Agriculture and allied sectors (i.e. crops, livestock, forestry and logging, fishing and aquaculture) play a vital role in Indian economy. It contributes around 18% of the country's Gross Value Added at basic prices and employs nearly half of the workforce.

The Rangelands Atlas has been developed to document and raise awareness on the enormous environmental, economic and social value of rangelands as well as their different ecosystems. It highlights many of the changes taking place in rangelands due to climate change, land use and conversion trends, investments and other changes.

In the search for alternatives to fossil fuel-based energy, FAO has been supporting the Zambian Government in developing and integrating sustainable bioenergy in the agriculture sectors The recently published report ‘Sustainable bioenergy potential in Zambia: An integrated bioenergy food security assessment’ documents findings to support policy

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