President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has submitted to the Liberian Senate for enactment a Bill titled: An Act to Amend Title 23, Natural Resources Law, Liberian Code Revised by Repealing Subchapter B, F

The Little Green Data Book 2017 is a pocket-sized ready reference on key environmental data for over 200 countries. Key indicators are organized under the headings of agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, oceans, energy, emission and pollution, and water and sanitation.

Expanding aquaculture in South East Asia over the last two decades has been the main driver of mangrove loss in the world, says a study published in PLOS One this month (June).

The Ocean Atlas illustrates the important role played by the seas and the global maritime ecosystems – not just for people living on the coasts but for all of us. The Atlas provides up-to-date insights into the state of the seas that form a basis of human livelihood and into the factors threatening them.

Building on work presented at the IUCN World Parks Congress (WPC) held in Sydney, Australia, on 12–19 November 2014, this document explores experiences with aquatic protected areas (PAs), marine protected areas (MPAs) and protected areas in inland waters in the context of livelihoods and food security.

Exponentially rising CO2 (currently ~400 μatm) is driving climate change and causing acidification of both marine and freshwater environments. Physiologists have long known that CO2 directly affects acid–base and ion regulation, respiratory function and aerobic performance in aquatic animals. More recently, many studies have demonstrated that elevated CO2 projected for end of this century (e.g.

The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) in 2014 highlighted the rampant use of antibiotics in the poultry sector and presence of antibiotic residues in chicken meat. Earlier,

The new FAO action plan on antimicrobial resistance 2016-2020 , aims to help countries equip their agricultural sectors to respond to growing threat.

A World Bank report examining how the transition to a ‘blue economy’ for Caribbean countries could not only generate growth, but also help countries to gain greater resilience to external shocks by better preserving the ocean.

Seafood fraud is a serious global problem that undermines honest businesses and fishermen that play by the rules. It also threatens consumer health and puts our oceans at risk. As global fishing becomes more expansive and further industrialized, seafood fraud and its related impacts could get even worse.

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