The World Bank has been supporting a comprehensive program to strengthen cooperative management and development within the Zambezi River Basin.

Water, climate and finance know no borders. This brings challenges and opportunities: The majority of freshwater worldwide flows in transboundary basins and most climate change impacts are felt through the water cycle.

This paper proposes that transboundary water governance needs to become an essential input to  sustainable  governance  of  protected  natural  reserves.  The  paper  reviews  the  challenges  and  opportunities for such governance mechanisms, and identifies the factors behind successful practices.  Successful transboundary governance of water a

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) recently launched a report and preliminary study on benefit sharing opportunities in the Meghna Basin for Bangladesh and India. Governance based on ‘benefit sharing’ is more holistic than traditional governance, which has historically been about allocating water.

The present issue of the data book provides updated basin/site-wise data of river basins (Region-III) covering aspects such as location, drainage area, temperature, average runoff, seasonal water flow, historical water levels, average sediment load, water quality parameters and land use statistics.

This study by Vasudha Foundation has created a comprehensive mapping of all existing and proposed coal fired power plants on water related parameters. It monitors the generation of coal based thermal power plants in river basins, that are affected by water scarcity and reviews how the power generation is impacted due to this.

The draft River Basin Management Bill proposes optimum development of inter-State rivers by facilitating inter-State coordination ensuring scientific planning of land and water resources taking basin/sub-basin as unit with unified perspectives of water in all its forms (including soil moisture, ground and surface water) and ensuring comprehensiv

China, India and other countries in Asia face urgent water challenges and won’t have sufficient water to develop further while ensuring food and energy security, according to a new report. The Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH) is the source region for the 10 major rivers that supply 40% of Asia’s population across 16 countries.

Water-related challenges are increasing in severity and global extent. They affect the developing world in particular, no more so than in South Asia which suffers from physical water scarcity, economic water scarcity and poor water quality.

This Synthesis publication covers lessons on interlinkages, trade-offs and benefits in managing water, energy and land/agriculture, as well as on protecting the environment derived from several transboundary river basins in Southern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia, and one aquifer system in North Africa.

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