With nearly half the world’s population affected by water scarcity and demand for freshwater continuing to soar, a WWF report released at the 20th International Riversymposium in Brisbane shows how governments can successfully protect and restore river flows – helping to ensure sufficient water for people and nature.

Protected areas are a cornerstone strategy for terrestrial and increasingly marine biodiversity conservation, but their use for conserving inland waters has received comparatively scant attention. In 2010, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) included a target of 17% protection for inland waters, yet there has been no meaningful way of measuring progress toward that target. Defining and evaluating “protection” is especially complicated for rivers because their integrity is intimately linked to impacts in their upstream catchments.

The Cooperation in International Waters in Africa (CIWA) program supports the management and development of transboundary waters for sustainable development, poverty alleviation, and improved climate resilience.

The objective of this study is to analyze heterogeneous perceptions of the relative importance of riverine ecosystem services to inform policy decisions. To improve allocation of scarce resources across competing uses, it is crucial to understand the values placed on various water uses.

This document presents the details on monitoring of glacial lakes and water bodies in the Indian Himalayan region during the month of June 2017 using satellite remote sensing technique including the data used and methodology followed in this study.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on River Pollution, 18/07/2017. The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) in association with the State Pollution Control Boards monitors the river water quality across the country through a network of 1275 monitoring stations on various rivers under the National Water Quality Monitoring Programme. As per the report published by CPCB in February 2015, 302 polluted river stretches have been identified on 275 rivers based on Bio-chemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) levels, a key indicator of organic pollution.

Unabated climate change would bring devastating consequences to countries in Asia and the Pacific, which could severely affect their future growth, reverse current development gains, and degrade quality of life, according to a report produced by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK).

Water is a stress multiplier in Africa. Climate change and development decisions manifest in stressed water resources, while poor governance further undermines water security.

This paper explores the potential of a range of peri-urban environmentalisms to come together in support of sustainable urbanisation. The present-day ‘urban,’ along with the dominant planning visions of urbanisation, lack in inclusivity, deliberative democracy, grassroots innovations, and bottom-up processes of knowledge generation.

Knowledge is the basis for sustainable development, but successful implementation depends on understanding what works in the field and where to improve lives and the environment.

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