Both Ecosystem-based Adaptation and Climate Risk Finance & Insurance can be used to enhance adaptation, reduce and transfer risk, and build resilience to the growing impacts from natural and human-made hazards. There is a nascent and growing interest in where these strategies may intersect and be mutually beneficial for adaptation.

With their ability to mobilise 1.5 billion smallholder producers, forest and farm producer organisations (FFPOs) can help drive a paradigm shift away from large-scale monocultural systems, which are vulnerable to climate change and highly inequitable.

Disasters kill people, destroy infrastructure, damage ecosystems and undermine development, and could increase in frequency due to climate change. There is a need for increased awareness on the latest advances in disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA).

Ninety scientific institutions led by the South African National Biodiversity Institute have released a shock report that unveils waves of unprecedented climate impacts tearing across South Africa's globally important wild assets.

The word “unprecedented” has been in regular use lately. As predictions about climate change increasingly become observations, are witnessing firsthand the impacts of more frequent and severe weather events. These events are playing havoc with health, agricultural systems, communities and economy.

Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) — a subset of nature-based approaches to help people adapt to climate change — is an increasingly popular strategy. Evidence from 13 initiatives in 12 countries shows that EbA can provide important, wide-reaching and long-term benefits relating to adaptation, the environment and social issues.

Of the 8,300 million tonnes of plastic produced from 1950 to 2015, only 7% has been recycled while more than half has been discarded in landfill or leaked into the environment. Companies, organisations, and governments are taking measures to tackle plastic pollution.

Land is already under growing human pressure and climate change is adding to these pressures. At the same time, keeping global warming to well below 2ºC can be achieved only by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors including land and food, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said in its latest report.

A universally accepted definition of green finance is not available yet, although several initiatives are ongoing across countries as also led by many international organizations.

Ensuring healthy diets for an expected global population of nearly 10 billion people in 2050, while at the same time improving the world those people live in, will require sweeping changes to farming and how we produce food, according to the World Resources Report 2019.

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