This discussion brief examines interactions between the SDGs on food security and gender equality, aiming to identify potential conflicts as well as opportunities to advance both goals simultaneously.

This paper examines how best to use revenues from a carbon tax to achieve both climate and non-climate goals, identifying pitfalls and strategies to avoid them. As many governments around the world consider carbon taxes (and other forms of carbon pricing), a common question is what to do with the revenue they generate.

This brief explores how the design of water resources governance systems in Colombia and Peru affect stakeholder participation, drawing on insights from SEI projects in both countries. There is a growing interest in improving the governance of natural resources to ensure both equity and sustainability.

This discussion brief explains the central concept of consumption-based accounting, and illustrates the kinds of new perspectives it can offer on responsibility for environmental impacts of production.

This brief, which builds on discussions at the Adaptation Futures 2016 conference, argues that in order to transform adaptation knowledge into successful action, we need research on adaptation as well as for it. Adaptation research is in high demand, as the need to adapt to unavoidable impacts of climate change is increasingly evident.

This paper presents an analysis of climate finance flows to Pacific Island states in 2010–2014, collectively and by country, as well as more recent data on flows from multilateral climate funds.

This paper examines the challenges and tensions that arise in financing energy infrastructure in sub-Saharan Africa, using case studies of Tanzania and Zambia to provide a historical perspective. Energy infrastructure investment is crucial to development and poverty reduction across Africa.

The United States now produces as much crude oil as ever – over 3.4 billion barrels in 2015, just shy of the 3.5 billion record set in 1970. Indeed, the U.S. has become the world’s No. 1 oil and gas producer.

This working paper presents findings and insights from a study of stove users in Kenya, providing insights on successful marketing strategies, in particular how behaviour change techniques and good after-sales relationships can help stove implementers to exploit social multiplier effects.

This working paper describes case studies in Kenya and Zambia that developed ‘user journeys’ to understand how households come to adopt an advanced cookstove, and the factors that support or hinder that process. A shift to advanced cookstoves can bring significant health and environmental benefits, but only with proper and consistent use.

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