This brief examines how California could limit the production of its principal energy production -- oil -- and the resulting implications for global GHG emissions. By many measures, the U.S. State of California has put in place climate policies that stand among the world's most ambitious.

This discussion brief explores the possibility of a “climate test” for new industrial development by focusing on a case study in the U.S. State of Washington. The debate in Washington over a new chemical facility – to make methanol, a building block of plastics – has centered on its GHG emissions.

Rwanda has committed itself to becoming a middle-income country by 2020. The country’s Vision 2020 and Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategies both set out goals to intensify agriculture, increase national energy output and improve access to modern energy services.

This working paper analyses the political factors that shape subsidies to coal extraction in Colombia, and explores why and how those subsidies have been promoted. Colombia is one of the world’s top five exporters of thermal coal, and the coal mining sector is a core pillar of the national government’s economic development policy.

This discussion brief examines the role of private actors in publicly funded agricultural adaptation projects in sub-Saharan Africa, identifying different types of involvement.

This paper analyses flows of climate finance to Cape Verde, the Comoros, Guinea-Bissau, the Maldives, Mauritius, São Tomé and Príncipe, and the Seychelles. This report highlights important trends in the allocation of climate finance across the region.

This study assesses the environmental integrity risks of international carbon markets under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement and discusses possible international rules to address them. A considerable risk is that several countries have mitigation targets that correspond to higher levels of emissions than business-as-usual (BAU) projections.

The Caribbean region’s Small Island Developing States (SIDS) face considerable threats from climate change, and considerable costs to cope with and adapt to climate impacts that exceed their financial capacity.

Reducing fossil fuel supply is necessary to meet the Paris Agreement goal to keep warming “well below 2°C”. Yet, the Paris Agreement is silent on the topic of fossil fuels.

This report details a study on whether countries should use certified emission reductions – or CERs – to achieve post-2020 targets under the Paris Agreement. The Clean Development Mechanism is the world’s largest greenhouse gas crediting mechanism and will continue to issue CERs until 2020.