Namibia’s development is guided by its 5-year periods National Development Plans within its long-term National Policy Framework, Vision 2030, and recently by the Harambee Prosperity Plan (HPP).

This report identifies actions, within and taken by developing countries, in response to climate hazards that lead to enhancement of adaptive capacity, strengthening resilience, and a reduction in vulnerability.

The greenhouse gases (GHG) emission inventory for the country is prepared according to the requirements under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines.

India has ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which is the primary multilateral treaty governing actions to combat climate change through adaptation and mitigation efforts directed at control of emission of Green House Gases (GHGs) that cause global warming.

The tell-tale physical signs of climate change such as increasing land and ocean heat, accelerating sea level rise and melting ice are highlighted in this new report released by the World Meteorological Organization on March 10, 2020.

The Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN), the implementation arm of the UNFCCC’s Technology Mechanism, has been matching the technology needs of developing countries with world-class solutions since 2013.

Climate action is undertaken by multiple actors across multiple levels of governance and for this reason climate governance has been established as a multi-level governance (MLG) process. But to what extent is MLG delivering climate-resilient outputs?

A key challenge in the collective endeavour to combat the climate emergency is the shift of global investment and financing flows that underpin current and future growth to low-carbon, climate-resilient (LCCR) growth.

This report draws together the key strands of analysis and results from analytical and capacity support activities undertaken as part of the “Ambition to Action” (A2A) project in Kenya between March 2017 and December 2019.

Time is running out to keep the global temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius and adapt to the impacts of climate change. While this reality has been widely acknowledged, global ambition is still not strong enough and the pace of action is too slow to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement.

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