Article 6 of the Paris Agreement provides the framework for a new generation of carbon markets in a context where all countries are supposed to formulate and implement ambitious Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) towards a temperature target and ratchet their contribution on a regular basis.

Time is running out to keep the global temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius and adapt to the impacts of climate change. While this reality has been widely acknowledged, global ambition is still not strong enough and the pace of action is too slow to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement.

The world is facing an existential threat. But it is also clear that without equity, ambition is not possible. The ongoing CoP25 must not duck this question any further says Centre for Science and Environment in its new position paper "COP 25: What the world must do"

The 25th Conference of the Parties (COP25) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Madrid, Spain, this December will be a turning point for global action towards the Paris Agreement. COP25 must build on the political momentum generated by the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit held on 23 September in New York.

Almost three-quarters of the 184 climate pledges made under the Paris Agreement aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions are inadequate to slow climate change, and some of the world's largest emitters will continue to increase emissions, according to a panel of world-class climate scientists.

Riven with scientific uncertainty, contending interests, and competing interpretations, the problem of climate change poses an existential challenge. For India, such a challenge is compounded by the immediate concerns of eradicating poverty and accelerating development.

The paper formulates 10 points for mitigation ambition and includes recommendations on ways to support ambition raising through international cooperation. All governments have committed to the long-term goal of the Paris Agreement.

UN Climate Change launched its Annual Report, highlighting the progress made on tackling climate change in 2018 and the ways in which the international community can raise ambition and achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement.

For the past two years, at the invitation of the Argentine and Japanese G20 presidencies, UNDP and WRI have together advised the G20 Climate and Sustainability Working Group on the key role that long-term strategies and NDCs are playing to advance the G20 agenda and address climate change.

The EU’s global climate leadership is at stake as a new political cycle begins amid increasingly polarised public opinion.

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