UN Climate Change has published an initial assessment of Nationally Determined Contributions, the NDC Synthesis Report, showing nations must redouble efforts and submit stronger, more ambitious national climate action plans in 2021 if they’re to achieve the Paris Agreement goal of limiting global temperature rise by 2°C—ideally 1.5°C—by the end

Because of the international community’s delay in cutting carbon emissions, some degree of reliance on carbon dioxide removal (CDR) options is now inevitable to achieve the Paris Agreement’s long-term temperature goal. This report seeks to answer questions regarding implementation of CDR options at scale.

With signing of the Paris Agreement, countries pledged to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to adapt to the impacts of climate change. By scaling up renewable energy, countries can sharply reduce one major source of the problem: energy-related CO2 emissions.

Every country has an important role to play in increasing the ambition of domestic climate action in response to our collective climate crisis. This report looks at the main mechanisms and drivers for the uptake of climate policies beyond just the borders of the country implementing them.

Article 6 of the Paris Agreement provides the framework for a new generation of carbon markets in a context where all countries are supposed to formulate and implement ambitious Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) towards a temperature target and ratchet their contribution on a regular basis.

Time is running out to keep the global temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius and adapt to the impacts of climate change. While this reality has been widely acknowledged, global ambition is still not strong enough and the pace of action is too slow to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement.

The world is facing an existential threat. But it is also clear that without equity, ambition is not possible. The ongoing CoP25 must not duck this question any further says Centre for Science and Environment in its new position paper "COP 25: What the world must do"

The 25th Conference of the Parties (COP25) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Madrid, Spain, this December will be a turning point for global action towards the Paris Agreement. COP25 must build on the political momentum generated by the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit held on 23 September in New York.

Almost three-quarters of the 184 climate pledges made under the Paris Agreement aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions are inadequate to slow climate change, and some of the world's largest emitters will continue to increase emissions, according to a panel of world-class climate scientists.

Riven with scientific uncertainty, contending interests, and competing interpretations, the problem of climate change poses an existential challenge. For India, such a challenge is compounded by the immediate concerns of eradicating poverty and accelerating development.

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