To finance the transition to low-carbon economies required to mitigate climate change, countries are increasingly using a combination of carbon pricing and green bonds. This paper studies the reasoning behind such policy mixes and the economic interaction effects that result from these different policy instruments.

This volume brings together a new set of multi-country empirical case studies that contribute to the understanding the complexities of development and resource governance in the context of climate change in the Mekong Region.

This discussion paper frames climate adaptation as a development challenge, reviewing what is known about its costs and benefits and the obstacles that private and public decision-makers face to adapt to climate change.

This discussion paper focuses on how, while many countries have made commitments or plans to integrate adaptation into their social and economic plans and policies, an “action gap” exists. A change in commitments and plans has not yet led to a significant difference in the way development is practiced in response to climate change impacts.

Insurance can be a key tool in reducing vulnerability and promoting resilience. Countries with high insurance coverage recover faster from disasters, and increasingly, governments are recognizing the role and benefits of insurance in transferring risk from disasters. Yet there is a large and even widening ‘protection gap’ of underinsurance.

Springs are the most important source of water for millions of people in the mid-hills of the Himalaya. Both rural and urban communities depend on springs for meeting their drinking, domestic, and agricultural water needs.

Climate finance takes its roots in the ever-intensifying debate about the health of our planet and actions being undertaken (or planned) by countries, cities and companies to keep it habitable for future generations. Financing for climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts is a global, complex, political and economic issue.

This guide presents a basis for understanding how nutrition, specifically undernutrition, is currently influenced by climate and weather, and may be further exacerbated by climate change.

The Green Climate Fund’s (GCF) 23rd Board Meeting today announced more than US$84.9 million towards United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) supported adaptation and mitigation efforts in Bhutan

The six-year project is mainly financed by the Green Climate Fund (GCF), world's largest multilateral fund for climate change action

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