The 2019 edition of the European Environment Agency (EEA) report on fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) confirms the good progress achieved in 2018 by the European Union (EU) in phasing-down the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), a set of fluorinated gases with a high global warming potential (GWP) that is significantly contributing to climate

Construction and demolition waste (C&DW) comprises the largest waste stream in the EU, with relatively stable amounts produced over time and high recovery rates.

The European energy system is undergoing rapid changes to set the EU economy on a low-carbon and resource-efficient path. Renewable energy is instrumental to this transformation.

Europe will not achieve its 2030 goals without urgent action during the next 10 years to address the alarming rate of biodiversity loss, increasing impacts of climate change and the over consumption of natural resources.

The European Union (EU) Emissions Trading System (ETS) governs about 40 % of total EU greenhouse gas emissions. It sets a cap on emissions from industrial activities (e.g. power and heat production, cement production, iron and steel production and oil refining), as well as aviation.

This report provides preliminary (‘approximated’ or proxy) estimates of greenhouse (GHG) emissions for the year 2018 in the European Union (EU) and other member countries of the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report shows that in 2018, EU GHG emissions decreased in 2018, with the largest emission reduction observed since 2014.

The annual ‘Trends and projections’ report provides an assessment of the progress of the EU and European countries towards their climate mitigation and energy targets. It is based on national data for greenhouse gas emissions, renewable energy and energy consumption.

Europe relies heavily on material resources for almost all of society’s activities. Its extraction and production of material resources have significant impacts on the environment and human health, as well as on the economy.

This report presents an updated overview and analysis of air quality in Europe from 2000 to 2017. It reviews the progress made towards meeting the air quality standards established in the two EU Ambient Air Quality Directives and towards the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guidelines (AQGs).

More investment is needed to make urban waste water treatment plants fit to meet the difficult challenges posed by the impacts of climate change, as well as the presence of antibiotics and other micro-pollutants in waste water, according to a European Environment Agency (EEA) briefing.

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