The promotion of a bioeconomy is a strategic driver for the transformation of biobased sectors for sustainable economic growth and development.

Open burning of crop residues in India is a serious issue that not only impacts human health but is also detrimental to soil health in the long term. According to the estimates from the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, about 500 million tonnes of crop residues are generated annually.

Analysis of household energy use has tended to focus on primary energy sources for cooking, lighting, and heating. However, even those using clean primary energy sources are not necessarily free from household air pollution and the burden of biomass collection because of commonly practiced fuel stacking.

Southeast Asia has a strong need to decarbonise its economies and modernise its energy systems. In 2018, around 75% of primary energy demand in the region was met by fossil fuels such as oil, coal and gas.

In its 2020 communiqué, the International Advisory Council on Global Bioeconomy has urged to strengthen good practices and policies to advance the global bioeconomy. The transition from a fossil-based economy to a bioeconomy happens at three levels: technological, organizational and social.

With international travel increasing post COVID-19 and the world looking to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, the aviation sector needs to make reductions in its carbon emissions.

As humanity’s demand on natural resources is increasingly exceeding Earth’s biological rate of regeneration, environmental deterioration such as greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere, ocean acidification and groundwater depletion is accelerating. As a result, the capacity of ecosystems to renew biomass, herein referred to as ‘biocapacity’, is becoming the material bottleneck for the human economy.

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Over the past decades and in multiple countries, bioenergy has supported the development of local economies, while helping to reduce the dependency on imported fossil fuels. If bioenergy resources are produced sustainably, their energy use can contribute to the reduction of GHG emissions.

East and Southern African countries possess vast potential for renewable energy development. Co-ordinated regional plans will play a vital role in scaling up the use of renewables for power generation, strengthening regional power supplies, meeting national climate commitments and ensuring energy security.

The Standing Committee on Energy, present this Seventeenth Report on ‘Action Plan for achievement of 175 Gigawatt (GW) Renewable Energy Target' relating to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. A potential of 1490.73 GW has been estimated from various renewable energy Sources i.e.

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