Since at least the 1980s, many farmers in northwest India have switched to mechanized combine harvesting to boost efficiency. This harvesting technique leaves abundant crop residue on the fields, which farmers typically burn to prepare their fields for subsequent planting. A key question is to what extent the large quantity of smoke emitted by these fires contributes to the already severe pollution in Delhi and across other parts of the heavily populated Indo-Gangetic Plain located downwind of the fires.

While there have been substantial efforts to quantify the health burden of exposure to PM2.5 from solid fuel use (SFU), the sensitivity of mortality estimates to uncertainties in input parameters has not been quantified. Moreover, previous studies separate mortality from household and ambient air pollution. In this study, we develop a new estimate of mortality attributable to SFU due to the joint exposure from household and ambient PM2.5 pollution and perform a variance‐based sensitivity analysis on mortality attributable to SFU.

The experimental work presented in this study was carried out with the hypothesis that plant derived smoke enhanced the morphological, physiological and biochemical attributes of a cereal crop, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Furthermore, this study supported the hypothesis that plant derived smoke acts as vegetative growth promoter, inexpensive, rapid and most appropriate eco-friendly bio-fertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

Original Source

A task force constituted by Niti Aayog on biomass management has pitched for providing financial support to those farmers who have not burnt their crop residues. The burning of agricultural residues leads to poor air quality across Northern India.

The ninth volume of the Report of the Committee on Doubling Farmers’ Income (DFI) examines the need and the scope to develop additional economic activities in the agrarian rural economy.

The ninth volume of the Report of the Committee on Doubling Farmers’ Income (DFI) examines the need and the scope to develop additional economic activities in the agrarian rural economy.

Order of the Supreme Court of India in the matter of M. C. Mehta Vs Union of India & Others dated 24/01/2018 regarding rising air pollution in Delhi NCR caused by stubble burning in Punjab, Haryana and Western Uttar Pradesh. Apex Court has been informed that the report of the Sub-Committee of the High Level Task Force on prevention of stubble burning in Punjab, Haryana and Western Uttar Pradesh was submitted on 18th December, 2017. Supreme Court asks EPCA to look into the Report of the Sub Committee and inform us of any suggestions or recommendations.

Global rice production systems face two opposing challenges: the need to increase production to accommodate the world's growing population while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Adaptations to drainage regimes are one of the most promising options for methane mitigation in rice production. Whereas several studies have focused on mid-season drainage (MD) to mitigate GHG emissions, early-season drainage (ED) varying in timing and duration has not been extensively studied.

Air quality in the Delhi National Capital Region (NCR) has been a matter of concern.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Air Pollution due to Crop Residue Burning, 22/12/2017. Burning of crop residue in various states can lead to higher level of pollution specially during adverse meteorological conditions in early winter in North India.

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