Nepal has 2.7% of the earth’s freshwater, yet the people of Kathmandu, Nepal’s most developed region, struggle with scarce water supply. Rapid urbanization, overpopulation, and overexploitation of groundwater reserves have led to water scarcity in the Kathmandu Valley.

This publication presents the outcomes of initiatives promoting climate-smart agricultural practices and technologies in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Nepal.

Freshwater ecosystems cover only 0.8% of the earth’s surface, but they are amongst the most diverse systems in the world. They are vital for the life and well-being of billions of people as they provide different direct and indirect services.

The Nepal Citizens Climate Budget describes the steps the government is taking to manage climate-related financial resources and presents the 2018/19 climate budget.This document is designed to help citizens, CSOs and journalists, as well as people’s representatives and parliamentarians and other policymakers, to understand how the government us

This note provides insights from the ODI report 'Building resilience for all: intersectional approaches for reducing vulnerability to natural hazards in Nepal and Kenya', which highlights challenges and opportunities for understanding intersecting inequalities and delivering effective intersectional approaches that help build resilience to natur

In Nepal, only 25% of water supply schemes are functioning well. While there are several approaches to setting up schemes, there is only one model of ongoing service management – community-based management through local water user committees.

Farming in the shadow of the world's highest mountains has never been easy - and climate change is making it even more difficult.

The Nepal Disaster Report, 2019 tries to comprehensively map the events, activities and programs carried out by the government, non government sectors and other humanitarian partner during the years, 2017 and 2018. This report presents a brief background on different risk of hazards along with the impact.

The global climate is changing rapidly and countries need clear direction on how best to adapt to these changes. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is becoming an increasingly popular strategy, especially in poor countries where dependence on natural resources for lives and livelihoods is high.

Intersectional approaches recognise that ‘people have different identities, needs, priorities and capacities which are not static, and will shift and change over time – affecting their ability to prepare for, cope with and respond to natural hazards and climate variability.’ This paper aims to better understand different factors that influence p

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