For many decades, cities in the Asia Pacific region have followed unsustainable patterns of transport development: worsening congestion and traffic safety, deteriorating air quality, high consumption of fossil fuels, and rising greenhouse gas emissions.

This study explores the benefits that can accrue if cities prioritise active mobility and public transport. It quantifies the benefits of walking, cycling, and public transport in the Africa region, comparing alternate investment scenarios for the 188 largest African cities.

In 2020, the Sustainable Mobility for All partnership applied its innovative approach for improved public decision making in transport to South Africa, using the set of tools it had developed—Catalogue of Policy Measures, and Selection Algorithm–to generate a country action plan of 31 most impactful policy measures to achieve sustainable mobilit

Electric mobility has garnered growing interest and significant momentum across several major global markets, often motivated by transport sector decarbonization. Together, Europe, China, and the United States account for more than 90 percent of the world’s electric vehicle fleet.

More robust measures on transport decarbonization are needed by 2030 to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, including reducing vehicle kilometers travelled and electrifying vehicles.

The Chhattisgarh government approved its Electric Vehicle (EV) Policy 2022 to make the state an EV-manufacturing hub, create employment, and reduce environment degradation. The government has set a target of five years in having EVs accounting for 15 per cent of the new registrations of vehicles, individual or commercial.

In recent years, Bengaluru has witnessed a massive surge of investment going towards private transport infrastructure. This has only worsened the traffic congestion crisis in the city while adding to the already high levels of Greenhouse gas emissions.

This report provides scenarios for future transport demand and CO2 emissions in North and Central Asia up to 2050 to help decision makers chart pathways to sustainable, resilient transport. The scenarios reflect existing policy initiatives and specific constraints in the region.

This study examines what India’s transport energy use and associated carbon emissions will look like in a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario over the next 30 years. It indicates that India’s transport sector will witness deep structural changes, driven by market forces, in the next couple of decades.

This report provides scenarios for future transport demand and CO2 emissions in Southeast Asia up to 2050 to help decision-makers chart pathways to sustainable, resilient transport. The scenarios reflect existing policy initiatives and specific constraints in the region.

Pages