In this paper, the Working Group on Mitigation Instruments (WGMI) provides a framework to choose the appropriate mitigation instruments for India’s transition to a low-carbon economy.

This brief analyses four key sectors of the manufacturing industry: iron and steel, cement, ammonia and chemicals (primarily petrochemicals), which have the highest emissions intensity of production. The analysis reveals that the opportunities to decarbonise the manufacturing sector are aplenty.

The Climate Finance Leadership Initiative (CFLI) published a report titled, ‘Financing the Low-Carbon Future: A Private-Sector View on Mobilizing Climate Finance,’ which identifies concrete opportunities for mobilizing private finance at the scale and speed needed to support an orderly and inclusive transition to a low-carbon global economy acro

To finance the transition to low-carbon economies required to mitigate climate change, countries are increasingly using a combination of carbon pricing and green bonds. This paper studies the reasoning behind such policy mixes and the economic interaction effects that result from these different policy instruments.

Why U.N.-led investors have drawn up a guide for firms to rethink threat to companies.

Investing in a Time of Climate Change – The Sequel (the Sequel) documents Mercer’s latest climate scenario model for assessing the effects of both climate-related physical damages (physical risks) and the transition to a low-carbon economy (transition risks) on investment return expectations.

Investing in a Time of Climate Change – The Sequel (the Sequel) documents Mercer’s latest climate scenario model for assessing the effects of both climate-related physical damages (physical risks) and the transition to a low-carbon economy (transition risks) on investment return expectations.

Australia’s QBE Insurance Group Ltd plans to stop offering new policies for thermal coal mines and coal-fired power stations to help encourage a low carbon economy and combat climate change.

With every tree felled and every piece of coal burned for energy, Indonesia is inching closer to its ecological tipping point.

With every tree felled and every piece of coal burned for energy, Indonesia is inching closer to its ecological tipping point. And once it passes that point, the country’s economy will greatly suffer, leading to an increase in poverty, a higher mortality rate and lower human development.

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