The adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Climate Change Agreement, all in 2015, highlights the strength of international commitment behind climate compatible development.

This working paper addresses the following question: are climate change-related expenditures starting to appear in national budgets to secure the early implementation of countries’ Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs)?

Incorporating climate risk management into infrastructure planning and design is critical to building societal resilience and protecting economic growth.

Drawing on CDKN’s experience of working with a wide range of cities, this working paper by Zoe Green, Lizzy Fitzgerald and Connie Norton of PwC identifies five levers of effective climate action in cities that climate change practitioners should be aware of, and where appropriate, build into their project approach to support more effective clima

This report provides a summary of the Raising Risk Awareness project’s results and learning. In summarising both the project’s activities and stakeholders’ responses, this report may prove useful to scientists, development agencies and civil society-based organisations who wish to build on this foundational work in the future.

This factsheet, from the Raising Risk Awareness initiative, examines the impact of the 2015-16 drought on Ethiopia’s drought management systems. Ethiopia has two major rainy seasons. The belg season runs from February to May and provides rainfall for agriculture in the centre of Ethiopia, as well as pasture for livestock.

CDKN’s flagship book, Mainstreaming Climate Compatible Development, draws from the alliance’s seven year experience of supporting climate compatible development in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.

A new report examines how to support the successful integration of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) into national development planning. The adoption of the Paris Agreement in 2015 signalled a major transition in the international climate change governance regime.

This working paper focuses on understanding the concept of ‘bankability’ in support of the development of quality climate project proposals – to assist countries’ access to international climate finance.

Assessing the future impacts of climate change on the hydroelectricity sector in Nepal is a challenge because of the country’s complex climate and hydrology, as well as the large changes in elevation that occur from low plains up to the high mountains.

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